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MetaFore Newsletter

by Sebastian Toledo last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:50 AM
For businesspeople focused on evaluating, selecting and manufacturing environmentally preferable wood and paper products, Metafore is a source of tools, information and innovative thinking. August 24, 2008, Issue 221

News

In UK, exporting recovered plastic bottles, paper to china cuts emissions
From Environmental Leader: A study published by Government-funded organization WRAP reveals that exporting recovered plastic bottles and paper to China produces less carbon emissions than landfilling them in the U.K. and replacing them with virgin materials, letsrecycle.com reports.

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Wal-Mart looks for stories behind green products
From GreenBiz: For Wal-Mart's 2009 Earth Month promotion, the company wants to be able to talk more about products, where they come from and why they are better choices.

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Congo basin forest is biggest for approved logging
Play a game, plant a tree, help restore the rainforest

From The Wall Street Journal: Going green can be entertaining and educational, thanks to the launch of Treewala(TM), a free, online vocabulary game that generates revenue to plant trees in South American rainforests. Treewala is the flagship initiative of Greenwala Inc., a "green" social media company in development where people can learn to be environmentally responsible, brag about being green and share their actions with their friends, family and community.

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Struggling forestries bet on biofuel boom
From Planet Ark: European and North American forestry companies are increasingly investing in making biofuels out of wood residues, a market they say will be closely linked with their core paper business.

The article in full

Related News: Can biofuels be sustainable?
 
Eco-police find new target: Oreos

From Fortune: What do Oreo cookies made by Nabisco (KFT, Fortune 500), Cheez-It crackers from Kellogg's (K, Fortune 500) or General Mills' (GIS, Fortune 500) Fiber One Chewy Bars have to do with global warming and the destruction of tropical rainforests? A lot, say environmental activists.

The full story

RILA to launch EPA sustainability web portal
From Environmental Leader: The Retail Industry Leaders Association announced that a Web portal on environmental sustainability and compliance issues will be launched later in the year.

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Indigenous community in Panama to see carbon payments from forest conservation
From Mongabay: The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), the Panama-based branch of the Smithsonian Institution, will offset its carbon dioxide emissions by working with an indigenous community to conserve forests and reforest degraded lands with native tree species.

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Brazil to establish oil palm plantations on degraded Amazon rainforest lands
From Mongabay: Brazil to compete with Malaysia in palm oil production but environmentalists worry redrawing of forest reserve law will hurt biodiversity conservation efforts.

Brazil will allow the establishment of oil palm plantations on degraded lands in the Amazon rainforest under a agreement signed between Brazil's ministers of agriculture and the environment, reports Folha de S. Paulo.

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Extinction most likely for rare trees in Amazon rainforest
From Science Daily: Common tree species in the Amazon will survive even grim scenarios of deforestation and road-building, but rare trees could suffer extinction rates of up to 50 percent, predict Smithsonian scientists and colleagues.

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Press Releases

New Adhesive a Major Commercial, Environmental Success
An inspiration that began when an Oregon State University researcher watched mussels being pounded by ocean waves has now evolved into a new wood adhesive that is creating jobs for U.S. workers, drawing interest from all over the world and leading a major shift away from formaldehyde-based composite wood products.

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Pulpwatch.org Reveals the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly in the Pulp and Paper Industry
A new website launched by an international coalition of NGOs brings together GoogleMaps technology, environmental risks and manufacturing data on pulp and paper mills to reveal their practices and rate their performance on social and environmental criteria. The website will be a tool for paper purchasers to find information easily on how a pulp mill is performing and identify social and environmental risks associated with those operations, no matter where they are in the world.

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