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BioSoc: the Biodiversity and Society Bulletin ISSUE 12: FEBRUARY 2007

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:03 AM
BioSoc: the Biodiversity and Society Bulletin ISSUE 12: FEBRUARY 2007

Research highlights on biodiversity and society, poverty and conservation

RESETTLEMENT AS A CONSERVATION TOOL: MORE MYTH THAN REALITY?

The human impact of protected areas continues to dominate the literature on poverty-conservation links. A recent issue of

Conservation and Society focusses on the debate surrounding displacement and relocation. Rangarajan and Shahabuddin set the scene with an analysis of the situation in India and this is supplemented by similar studies by McElwee for Southeast Asia and by Goodall for Australia. Despite the different geographies, a common theme emerges from these three analyses: local people are often the focus of those concerned with the impacts of people on protected areas when they are often not the greatest threat. The authors highlight some of the politics behind displacements, noticing that it is often minority groups that are targetted while the more powerful players – including mining and tourism companies aswell, in some cases, as park authorities – are left to their own devices. As a result, resettlement does not address the root causes of biodiversity loss.

SOURCE

Rangarajan, M and Shahabuddin, G (2006)

Displacement and Relocation from Protected Areas: Towards a Biological and Historical Synthesis. Conservation and Society Vol 4, No 3, 359 – 378 No Roads, Only Directions. Conservation and Society Vol 4, No 3, 379-382 Exclusion and Re-emplacement: Tensions around Protected Areas in Australia and Southeast Asia. Conservation and Society Vol 4, No 3, 383 – 395 Displacement and Relocation Redux: Stories from Southeast Asia. Conservation and Society Vol 4, No 3, 396 – 403 Eviction for Conservation: A Global Overview. Conservation and Society Vol 4, No 3, 424 – 470

BIOSOC

BioSoc is a new monthly email bulletin from the Poverty and Conservation Learning Group (PCLG), hosted by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). BioSoc highlights key new research on biodiversity and society, poverty and conservation and is available in English, Spanish and French.

All issues are available online at: www.povertyandconservation.info

Please let us know about other networks that might be interested in subscribing by emailing us at: BioSoc@iied.org

POVERTY AND CONSERVATION LEARNING GROUP (PCLG)

The PCLG aims to share key information, highlight new research highlight and promote learning on poverty-conservation linkages. For more information visit: www.povertyandconservation.info

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