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Metafore Newsletter: In Focus, January 28, 2007

by Portal Web Editor last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:03 AM This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.
HP expects to surpass recycling goal of 1 billion pounds; From competition to cooperation: Companies collaborate on social and environmental issue; Ottawa vows $30 million to protect Great Bear Rainforest; Innovest names the 100 most sustainable companies in the world; The greener side of business; Timber industry focuses on biomass projects; Report warns of obstacles to sustainable biofuels sector; Canada worried by plunging caribou population; Saving Ethiopia’s forest, and its cutters; Neenah Paper Announces New Environmental Platform

 

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January 28, 2007

HP expects to surpass recycling goal of 1 billion pounds
From GreenBiz:
HP recycled more than 164 million pounds (74 million kilograms) of hardware and HP print cartridges globally in its 2006 fiscal year -- an increase of 16 percent over the previous year and the equivalent weight of more than 600 jumbo jet airliners.

In addition, HP collected more than 2.5 million units of hardware globally -- weighing more than 50 million pounds (22.6 million kilograms) -- to be refurbished for resale or donated.

The full story…

From competition to cooperation: Companies collaborate on social and environmental issues
Collaborative initiatives bring together companies, investors, and activists to address issues such as online freedom of expression, climate change, and labor rights in the global supply chain
From SocialFunds.com: Competition may drive capitalism, but cooperation is gaining ground as an important business strategy for addressing social and environmental issues that impact companies across the board. Increasingly, companies are joining forces not only with business competitors, but also with human rights and environmental activists (formerly considered enemies) as well as socially responsible investors (SRIs), academics, and governmental organizations.

Read on…

Ottawa vows $30 million to protect Great Bear Rainforest
From The Globe and Mail:
If you wait long enough, people may really pay attention when you do something.
That certainly seemed to be the case recently, as environmental groups and native leaders heaped praise on the federal Conservatives for promising to cough up $30-million toward a unique, ambitious fund to create employment as well as protect the hallowed Great Bear Rainforest.

Details…

Innovest names the 100 most sustainable companies in the world
From GreenBiz:
Innovest Strategic Value Advisors this week will officially launch the third Global 100 list of the most sustainable corporations in the world at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

The G100, initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. with Innovest as the exclusive research provider, includes companies from 16 countries in sectors ranging from Oil and Gas to Wireless Telecommunication Services that were evaluated according to how effectively they manage environmental, social and governance risks and opportunities, relative to their industry peers.

More…

The greener side of business
An interview with the president of Environmental Defense
From Forbes: Corporations often need to be nudged, cajoled or even picketed before they'll step up and do the right thing. That's especially true for energy, chemical, shipping and other businesses whose everyday operations have an enormous impact on the environment.

Getting top execs to rethink that impact falls to activists like Fred Krupp. He's the president of Environmental Defense, a nonprofit group with an $80 million budget. Krupp's main objective: to get businesses to understand that being green doesn't mean a bottom line awash in red ink.

Details…

Timber industry focuses on biomass projects
From The Statesman Journal (Oregon):
After nearly 90 years of sawing pine and Douglas fir logs into lumber, Rough & Ready Lumber Co. is branching into the energy business, building a $5 million plant to burn logging debris and to produce electricity that it can sell at a "green tag" premium to the regional power grid.

Since Congress reauthorized a federal energy production tax credit for biomass, solar and wind power last month, at least two other sawmills in Oregon are going forward with biomass projects.

More…

Report warns of obstacles to sustainable biofuels sector
From Environmental News Network:
The benefits of biofuel made from beets, sugar cane and other crops may be weakened if the sector continues to expand without controls and trade agreements, an environmental think tank said on Friday.

As more developing countries follow Brazil's lead in promoting biofuels, trade agreements and some form of regulation are needed to make biofuel solutions work, said Annie Dufey of the London-based International Institute for Environment and Development.

Read on…

Canada worried by plunging caribou population
From Yahoo:
The caribou population in Canada's vast Northwest Territories is falling rapidly and the increasingly warm climate could slow the animals' chances of recovery, says a wildlife specialist.

More…

Saving Ethiopia’s forest, and its cutters
An effort to help women abandon illegal harvesting is expanding, teaching new skills and forest management
From The Christian Science Monitor: Since she was six years old, Maselech Mercho has hiked up into the lush Entoto hills near Addis Ababa to gather wood, illegally, from the protected eucalyptus forests. She has no tools but her hands, so she pulls the branches she can reach, and carries out some 65 lbs. of firewood on her back.

For many in Ethiopia, however, this is nice work if you can get it. The annual per capita income here is about $120 a year – about half of what Maselech might earn in a good year. But some 15,000 women and girls gather fuel from Entoto – destroying Addis Ababa's last bits of forestland in the process.

Keep reading…

Press Release
Neenah Paper Announces New Environmental Platform
As a manufacturing company, Neenah Paper has long been an industry leader in the development of sustainable products and processes, from recycled content papers to chlorine free technologies. Neenah’s comprehensive new environmental platform includes expanded offerings certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Processed Chlorine Free (PCF) certified papers.

The full release…

 

 

 

 

 


This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.

NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

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