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Metafore Newsletter: In Focus, June 3, 2007

by metafore — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:03 AM This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.
News: Lego and IKEA Most-Respected Companies Worldwide, Study Finds; GE reports $12B in environmental revenues; Plywood makers: pass tougher trade laws; IT Going Green: Forces pulling in different directions; Editorial: Most private owners show little interest in timber harvests; Schools going green to save on electric bills, teach students; Peruvian Mahogany Logged Illegally, Report Says; U.S. tropical timber imports fall by half in 2006; Junk mail: who needs it?

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June 3, 2007

News

Lego and IKEA Most-Respected Companies Worldwide, Study Finds
From Greenbiz.com: "IKEA and Lego are two companies that have taken responsibility for the development of their region and country and are seen as national icons," said Charles Fombrun, CEO of the Reputation Institute. "They have earned their trust, respect and admiration from behaving in ways that are relevant to their key stakeholders and that's why they’re rated tops by the public."

Read on….

GE reports $12B in environmental revenues
From the World Business Council for Sustainable Development: GE has demonstrated that “going green” is good for the bottom line. The company reports that global revenue from the its “ecomagination” portfolio of energy efficient and environmentally advantageous products and services reached $12 billion in 2006, a 20 per cent increase over 2005, with back orders exceeding $50 billion.

More….

Plywood makers: pass tougher trade laws
From Business Week: U.S. manufacturers of hardwood plywood used in kitchen cabinets and furniture testified Wednesday they are in danger of being driven out of business by Chinese panels that are not only cheaper, but also often made of toxic glue and timber harvested illegally.

Read more….

IT Going Green: Forces pulling in different directions
From Financial Times: Research published in February by Jonathan Koomey, a consulting professor at Stanford University, found that total power used by servers represented 0.6 per cent of total US electricity consumption in 2005.

IT is increasingly coming under scrutiny, not just from corporate social responsibility advocates, but also from the board for its power use. With energy prices high in historic terms, CFOs want to see power used more sparingly by IT. And in practical terms, CIOs might not even have access to the power they need.

More….

Editorial: Most private owners show little interest in timber harvests
From The Daily Journal: A recent survey of private forest owners in Minnesota reveal some interesting facts. Almost 77 percent of the estimated 140,000 forestland owners have never heard of the Sustainable Forest Incentive Act and only about 15 percent of forestland owners would be interested in the SFIA program that would reduce taxes on their land. When the SFIA program was first introduced in 2002, it was expected that at least 3,000 forest owners would take advantage of the incentive program.

Continue reading….

Schools going green to save on electric bills, teach students
From the Associated Press: When it's finished, Arabia Mountain High School will have naturally lit classrooms and an aggressive recycling program. It's part of a "green school" movement that is growing in popularity nationwide, with schools leaning toward solar panels, living roofs and wetlands. School districts say the environmentally friendly properties save energy costs while educating students about the world around them.

Read more….

Peruvian Mahogany Logged Illegally, Report Says
From Reuters: More than 12 percent of the mahogany exported by Peru is logged illegally and most of the companies working in the sector are guilty, environmentalists said Wednesday in a report rejected by the government.

Local campaign group AIDESEP said Peru, one of the world's leading exporters of the timber known as "red gold" due to its reddish sheen and high value, had issued export permits to companies involved in illegal logging.

Read on….

U.S. tropical timber imports fall by half in 2006
From Mongabay.com: Tropical lumber imports into the United States fell from 353,985 cubic meters in 2005 to 176,806 cubic meters in 2006, reports the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) in its latest update. Tropical timber made up only 12 percent of U.S. hardwood lumber imports by volume for the year. Among tropical timber, mahogany has been displaced by balsa at the leading importer tropical wood.

More….

Junk mail: who needs it?
From The Courier-Journal: The Center for the New American Dream, a Maryland-based group that is leading the charge against the mailings, says 100 million trees are cut down each year to make the paper for junk mail -- and much of that ends up in landfills.

More….

 

 

   
 
This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.

NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

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