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Metafore Newsletter: In Focus, September 16, 2007

by Metafore — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:03 AM
Contributors: rhessmiller
This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service. NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
News: Companies to be recognized for outstanding climate change actions; Conservationists team up with Toyota to save Philippine rain forests; Forest nations press for carbon credits to help cut greenhouse gas; 2007 Sustainable Business Awards; Leave only footprints: Measuring and managing corporate carbon emissions; Computers' elusive eco factor; Trade group launches eco-tool for envelope manufacturers; China's forest products trade up 35.3 percent in first half of year; Canadian sawmills need to compete in global market, report says; China urged to join effort to defend Amazon from soy; Forest Service chief: Use trees to power cars; Help us make In Focus an even better newsletter for you, our readers. Press Release: Tembec to Receive Prestigious FSC Winds of Change Award

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In Focus 
For businesspeople focused on evaluating, selecting and
manufacturing environmentally preferable products, Metafore
is a source of tools, information and innovative thinking.
September 16, 2007, Issue 172
Metafore News
Companies to be recognized for outstanding climate change actions
The winners of the second annual Metafore Innovation Awards will be announced at a Metafore-sponsored reception at the Corporate Climate Response Conference in Chicago on September 25. The awards recognize products and services that demonstrate environmental performance innovations in the marketplace--and this year's theme is specific to climate change innovations. Past finalists include Columbia Forest Products, Time Inc. and Starbucks Coffee Co.
News
Conservationists team up with Toyota to save Philippine rain forests

From The Associated Press: Efforts to protect Philippine rain forests from illegal logging received a boost from a US $1.5 million (€1 million) corporate donation for a reforestation project, an environmental group said Thursday.

Conservation International said its partnership with Japan's Toyota Motor Corp., which will provide the funds over the next three years, will help restore northeastern forests in an area larger than Switzerland. Plans also include offering jobs to indigenous people to prevent illegal logging.

Forest nations press for carbon credits to help cut greenhouse gas

From MSNBC: Eight nations with the largest tropical forests have agreed to push for their protection to be made eligible for carbon credits.

Rachmat Witoelar, Indonesia's environment minister, said Brazil, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Gabon, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Congo and Indonesia, with 80 per cent of the world's tropical forest cover, had formed the Forestry Eight, whose goal is to have forest preservation included in the successor to the Kyoto protocol on climate change, which expires in 2012. Under Kyoto, only reforestation and afforestation are eligible for carbon credits.

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2007 Sustainable Business Awards

From Business Week: The flurry of interest in environmentally responsible companies has made it difficult to distinguish corporations that truly innovate through greener governance or by developing hyper-efficient products from those that simply employ pale green public relations. But according to the judges of Progressive Investor's recently announced Sustainable Business 20 awards, many companies, large and small, foreign and domestic, will make genuine strides towards sustainability in 2007-without compromising their bottom lines.

The annual list highlights companies that, according to the newsletter's panel, can serve as shining green examples for others. It includes organizations that have managed to minimize the impact of their own operations on the environment as well as those that make energy-saving products. The winners are notable for their diversity, including high-octane, global brands as well as lesser-known technology providers.

Leave only footprints: Measuring and managing corporate carbon emissions

From GreenBiz: Take only memories, leave only footprints -- so goes the adage imploring campers to minimize their ecological impact. Yet when it comes to CO2, the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) contributing to climate change, humanity's collective carbon footprint threatens to smother the planet underfoot.

Corporations have particularly big "feet," though a mix of scientific, regulatory, market, normative, and moral forces are compelling companies to shrink their shoe size. While the Brannock Device is the standard tool for measuring human feet, no such standard yet exists for carbon footprints. A proliferation of yardsticks for measuring carbon footprints have emerged over the past few years, challenging companies and investors alike to discern the best way to gauge carbon footprints.

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Computers' elusive eco factor

From Business Week: Consumers who want to weigh how their purchases affect the environment have plenty of guidelines and seals of approval to choose from for everything from cars to tissue paper. But finding out just how eco-friendly a computer is can be a bigger chore.

There are several competing yardsticks, each considering a different aspect of a computer's greenness, be it energy consumption, use of toxic materials, or how easily it can be recycled. None by itself provides a complete picture. And since consumers aren't demanding environmentally friendly computers in large numbers, makers of those machines have little incentive to market PCs that way.

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Trade group launches eco-tool for envelope manufacturers

From GreenBiz: An envelope manufacturing trade group announced this week a new tool to help industry stakeholders learn about environmental best practices.

The Envelope Manufacturers Association Foundation (EMAF) created the Environmental Awareness Toolkit, a CD-ROM with information about the latest technologies, best practices and other aids to improve environmental management across the manufacturing process. This spans the tree harvesting of paper and pulp companies to the end users who receive envelopes in the mail, and include window film, adhesive and ink companies.

China's forest products trade up 35.3 percent in first half of year

From the People's Daily: China's foreign trade of forest products reached 27.2 billion U.S. dollars in the first half of this year, up 35.3 percent over the same period in 2006, the State Forestry Administration (SFA) said on Wednesday.

Exports of forest products went up 41 percent to 15.5 billion U.S. dollars and imports rose 28 percent to 11.7 billion U.S. dollars, said Cao Qingyao, SFA spokesman.

Cao said the imports were mainly primary products, such as paper pulp, and the exports were high value-added or labor-intensive materials with competitive advantages, adding "China's forest products foreign trade structure is improving."

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Canadian sawmills need to compete in global market, report says

From Canadian Business: A strong loonie, falling lumber prices and a new softwood lumber export tax combined to smack Canadian lumber companies hard in 2006 and push them into the red in the second quarter this year, a new report says.

And now, International Wood Markets Group president Russ Taylor said, they must also compete in a globalized marketplace where new lumber players are staking the claim to being the lowest cost producers in the world.

"North America has been a big net exporter for decades, we had the trees, the know how and the world needed our wood and in fact it was a great business," Taylor said.

China urged to join effort to defend Amazon from soy

From Planet Ark: China, the world's top soy importer, should join an emerging alliance in Brazil to protect Amazon forests and promote sustainable soy production, the head of an international crushers' association said.

The formation of the alliance follows Malaysia's Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which links plantations, consumers and traders to support sustainable production of palm oil and to prevent deforestation in Southeast Asia. RSPO is to launch the first certified palm oil from sustainable production early next year.

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Forest Service chief: Use trees to power cars

From The Associated Press: The U.S. Forest Service chief is proposing replacing 15 percent of the nation's gasoline with ethanol made from wood, while doubling the amount of carbon dioxide emissions absorbed by public and private forests.

"These are ambitious goals, and they would take a concerted national effort to reach," Forest Service Chief Abigail Kimbell said in remarks prepared for a speech before the Society of Environmental Journalists Friday night in San Francisco.

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Help us make In Focus an even better newsletter for you, our readers.
Press Release
Tembec to Receive Prestigious FSC Winds of Change Award

Tembec is pleased to announce that it has been chosen by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Canada as the recipient of the 2007 Winds of Change Award recognizing the company's contribution to safeguarding the forests.

Ontario Environment Minister, Laurel Broten, will present the award to Mr. Lopez on September 28, 2007 in Toronto at an FSC gala that will be attended by public and private sector dignitaries, officials of First Nations, labour and environmental organizations.


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Black Line  This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.
 
NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
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