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Metafore Newsletter: In Focus, September 30, 2007

by Metafore — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:03 AM
Contributors: rhessmiller
This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service. NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.
News: Metafore announces winners of Annual Innovation Awards; Top execs are embracing corporate responsibility; Greenhouse gas emissions rarely figure in investor decisions; Business leaders call for public policies that leverage forest carbon cycle; Canadian forest industry losing out on rising dollar; Buy your way to carbon neutrality?; Beer basics: Wal-Mart to measure energy use; B.S. detector a handy tool for sustainability reporting; Brazil claims first with carbon auction; Many biofuels have more climate impact than oil; Buyers kept in the dark about green issues.



 
 
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In Focus
Forbusinesspeople focused on evaluating, selecting and
manufacturing environmentally preferable products, Metafore
is a source of tools, information and innovative thinking.
 
September 30, 2007, Issue 174
 
 
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Metafore News
 
Metafore announces winners of Annual Innovation Awards
Metafore announced the winners of the second annual Metafore Innovation Awards at the Green Power Corporate Climate Response Conference.
 
The two winners of the 2007 Metafore Innovation Awards were announced and recognized at a special reception at the Corporate Climate Response Conference Sept. 25 in Chicago. This year's Innovation Awards theme was innovations "that reduce or offset climate change through new methods and processes."

Congratulations to Catalyst Paper Corporation and the Doubletree Hotel and Executive Meeting Center - Portland. 
 
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News
 
Top execs are embracing corporate responsibility
From GreenBiz: Having environmental policies in place is more than just good public relations, a majority of executives responded in a survey conducted for global accounting firm Grant Thornton. Three-quarters of respondents likewise agreed that corporate responsibility could increase profits.
 
The belief that corporate responsibility can increase a company's bottom-line will lead to a swell in spending for corporate responsibility issues in the immediate future, the executives predicted. This increase in spending is especially noteworthy, as it is occurring during an all time low in business confidence Grant Thornton reported.
 
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Greenhouse gas emissions rarely figure in investor decisions
From The NY Times: Corporations have become better about disclosing their greenhouse gas emissions and somewhat better about curbing them. But few investors are using that information to decide where to put their money.
 
That was the gist of the fifth annual report of the Carbon Disclosure Project, a nonprofit group that monitors corporate disclosure related to climate change. The group, which gathers its data through surveys, represents 315 institutional investors that manage a total of $41 trillion in assets.
 
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Business leaders call for public policies that leverage forest carbon cycle
From World Business Council for Sustainable Development: A group of World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) member companies is calling for public policies that make the best use of the forestry sector's carbon profile and carbon cycle.

The Sustainable Forest Products Industry (SFPI) working group proposes six key points that those responsible for devising forestry and carbon policies need to know, and it highlights the carbon opportunities and challenges facing the sector in its publication.

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Canadian forest industry losing out on rising dollar
From the Financial Post: As the Canadian dollar crept within 2¢ of parity with the US dollar, one of the country's leading forestry lobbies accused the Bank of Canada of letting the loonie bounce like a penny stock, and called for a rapid response to rein in its upward movement.

The forestry industry loses about $500-million with every US1¢ rise in the dollar, and is arguably the most vulnerable major industry in the country to currency fluctuations, since all of its input costs -- energy, labour and raw materials -- are in Canadian dollars, while much of its revenue comes from U.S.-dollar exports.

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Buy your way to carbon neutrality?
From The Seattle Times: The Oscar-winning film "An Inconvenient Truth" touted itself as the world's first carbon-neutral documentary.

The producers said that every ounce of carbon emitted during production - from jet travel, electricity for filming and gasoline for cars and trucks - was counterbalanced by reducing emissions somewhere else. It only made sense that a film about the perils of global warming wouldn't contribute to the problem.

Beneath the feel-good simplicity of buying your way to carbon neutrality is a growing concern that the idea is more hype than solution.

According to Native Energy, money from "An Inconvenient Truth," along with payments from others trying to neutralize their emissions, went to the developers of a methane collector on a Pennsylvanian farm and three wind turbines in an Alaskan village.

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Beer basics: Wal-Mart to measure energy use
From MSNBC: What exactly did it take to make that beer you're drinking? Retail giant Wal-Mart said Monday it will partner with a nonprofit climate group to measure the amount of energy used to create beer - as well as six other product categories sold at its stores.
 
The goal, said Wal-Mart and its partner the Carbon Disclosure Project, is to then find ways to make products more efficiently and, in the process, reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases tied to global warming.
 
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B.S. detector a handy tool for sustainability reporting
From The Gazette: Non-governmental organizations - while important and relevant - often get an easy ride from the media compared with industry and government, top-drawer journalists told an international forum on corporate responsibility and sustainability on Thursday.

In the final panel discussion of Tremblant Forum 07, Marc Gunther, author, columnist and senior writer for Fortune magazine, told about 130 participants that some of his best friends, including his wife and daughter, work for NGOs.

"That said, I think we in the press give them entirely too much credibility. Their agendas are often not pure, often it's about raising their own profile, raising money, attracting members," Gunther said.
 
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Brazil claims first with carbon auction
From the Houston Chronicle: Brazil's largest city sold millions of dollars worth of carbon credits at an auction Wednesday in a deal that experts said paves the way for developing countries to make money fighting global warming.
 
Brazil's Mercantile and Futures Exchange called Sao Paulo's sale of $18.5 million in carbon credits to Dutch-Belgian Fortis Bank the first such sale to be held on a regulated stock market and a significant step toward institutionalizing the carbon market.
 
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Many biofuels have more climate impact than oil
From Reuters: Most crops grown in the United States and Europe to make "green" transport fuels actually speed up global warming because of industrial farming methods, says a report by Nobel prize winning chemist Paul J. Crutzen.
 
The findings could spell particular concern for alternative fuels derived from rapeseed, used in Europe, which the study concluded could produce up to 70 percent more planet-warming greenhouse gases than conventional diesel.
 
The study suggested scientists and farmers focused on crops, which required less intensive farming methods, to produce better benefits for the environment.
 
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Buyers kept in the dark about green issues
From The Times: Eighty per cent of consumers say that they are not given enough environmental information to make informed choices about electrical products.
 
The latest in a monthly series of surveys for The Times by Populus, charting consumers' social and environmental attitudes, finds that while many want to make ethical choices, they are frustrated by a lack of information.
 
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  This newsletter was made possible through support provided by the Global Development Alliance and the Office of Environmental and Natural Resources, Bureau for Economic Growth Agriculture and Trade, U.S. Agency for International Development, and by the USDA Forest Service International Programs, under the terms of Award No. 03-DG-11132762-027. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the USDA Forest Service.
 
NOTE:In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107, any copyrighted material herein is distributed without profit or payment for non-profit research and educational purposes only. For more information, go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this newsletter for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

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