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USAID Releases First-Ever Annual Report To Congress On Orphans And Vulnerable Children

by USAID — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:03 AM
Contributors: rhessmiller
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 12, 2007 www.usaid.gov WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) released the first-ever annual report to Congress detailing U.S. Government (USG) efforts to address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children throughout the developing world. Fiscal year 2006 funding for U.S. programs that included services for orphans and vulnerable children exceeded $5 billion and reached more than 135 million children, according to the report titled Highly Vulnerable Children: Causes, Consequences and Actions....

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) released the first-ever annual report to Congress detailing U.S. Government (USG) efforts to address the needs of orphans and vulnerable children throughout the developing world. Fiscal year 2006 funding for U.S. programs that included services for orphans and vulnerable children exceeded $5 billion and reached more than 135 million children, according to the report titled Highly Vulnerable Children: Causes, Consequences and Actions.

Mandated by law (Public Law 109-95), the Assistance to Orphans and Other Children in Developing Countries Act of 2005 was enacted to improve coordination, communication and effectiveness of USG assistance targeted towards orphans and vulnerable children all around the world. Termed by USAID as highly vulnerable children (HVC), this includes children affected by natural disaster, HIV/AIDS, war and conflict, internal displacement, exploitive labor, trafficking, disability, abandonment, extreme poverty and other causes.

"It is a moral imperative that we do all we can to alleviate child suffering," said Dr. S. Ken Yamashita, USG Special Advisor for Orphans and Vulnerable Children. "There are roughly 143 million orphans alone in the developing world today, yet this number is dwarfed when also considering children who are vulnerable for any number of reasons. I am pleased this first report to Congress describes the wide scope of ongoing, U.S.-funded programs assisting highly vulnerable children, but it is just a starting point. It also indicates where we can, and should, have more impact."

The report represents the first time multiple U.S.-funded programs for highly vulnerable children have been catalogued and described in one specialized publication, and includes detailed accounts of several initiatives implemented during the past 12 months to accelerate implementation of the Act. Highlights of the initiative include:

  • The formation of an HVC Secretariat at USAID, as well as an Interagency Committee for Highly Vulnerable Children. This committee includes representatives from USAID, the U.S. Department of State, the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and the U.S. Department of Labor, as well as those from the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and civil society.
  • The first-ever categorization of U.S.-funded programs for highly vulnerable children in order to establish a sound basis for gathering program data and information. These program categories include direct service delivery; capacity building; policy, diplomacy and advocacy; demonstration projects and operations research; and documentation and dissemination of information.
  • Designated as 'accelerated' HVC countries, Ethiopia, Uganda and Indonesia have more than one U.S. Government program in place that address HVCs and are therefore targeted for enhanced coordination for linking services, leveraging resources, etc. More of these types of countries will be identified soon.
  • Initial development of a broad strategic information system that will include program information at country-level; and
  • Extensive collaboration with civil society organizations and other program implementers for continual dialogue and feedback.

To view the report, visit http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PDACK053.pdf.

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