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U.S. Coast Guard Fisheries Enforcement Shiprider Operations

The U.S. Coast Guard regularly exercises 16 bilateral fisheries law enforcement shiprider agreements with countries in the Eastern Pacific and in West Africa. These agreements enable U.S. government vessels and U.S. Coast Guard law enforcement personnel to help host nation law enforcement personnel better exercise their authority. Shiprider agreements help close global maritime law enforcement gaps; improve cooperation, coordination, and interoperability; and build maritime law enforcement capacity to more effectively combat illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing and other illegal activity. The adoption of shiprider agreements between other countries and in other regions could help strengthen global maritime law enforcement efforts.

Bilateral maritime law enforcement shiprider agreements provide U.S. government vessel and aircraft platforms and maritime law enforcement expertise to assist host nation law enforcement officials with exercising their authority.  These agreements promote host nation sovereignty by helping the host nation enforce their laws and regulations.  Shiprider agreements help close global maritime law enforcement gaps; improve cooperation, coordination, and interoperability; and build maritime law enforcement capacity to more effectively combat illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing and other illegal activity.

The agreements allow partner nation law enforcement officials to embark on vessels and aircraft of the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Navy, where authorized by the agreements; and allow authorized U.S. vessels and aircraft to assist host country law enforcement officials with maritime surveillance and boarding vessels under the official’s authority and jurisdiction.  Generally, shiprider agreements are executed by U.S. Coast Guard vessels, aircraft, and maritime law enforcement officials; however, U.S. Navy, host nation, and third-party government vessels and aircraft participate as well, where authorized in the agreements.  The U.S. Navy supports joint shiprider operations through the Africa Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership (AMLEP) and the Oceania Maritime Security Initiative (OMSI).

The U.S. has signed a counter-high seas driftnet bilateral shiprider agreement with China, five (four permanent, one expired temporary) bilateral shiprider agreements with West African countries (Cape Verde, The Gambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Senegal) and ten permanent bilateral shiprider agreements with Pacific Island countries (Kiribati, Palau, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Cook Islands, Tonga, Nauru, Tuvalu, Samoa, and Vanuatu).

The collaborative, ongoing, international fisheries enforcement shiprider operations have been conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard over the past 23 years with China and 9 years with the West African and Pacific Island countries.

Shiprider agreements are an innovative and collaborative way to more effectively police the world’s ocean.  The adoption of shiprider agreements between other countries and in other regions could help further strengthen global maritime law enforcement efforts.  Countries interested in learning more about shiprider agreements are welcome to contact the U.S. Coast Guard through the point of contact listed on this project or their local U.S. Embassy.

https://www.uscg.mil/

U.S. Coast Guard Fisheries Enforcement Shiprider Operations
Timeframe: Jan. 01, 2001 - Dec. 30, 2020
Project Status: Ongoing
Contact: Luke Slivinski
Email: Log in to view
Thematic Focus: Enforcement
Geographic Areas: West Africa, Pacific Islands, East Asia
Activity Type: Ongoing partnership
 
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