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Conservation Finance Smart List -

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:00 AM
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File Linking Biodiversity Conservation and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene: Experiences from sub-Saharan Africa by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 07:31 AM
The paper, authored by David Bonnardeaux and commissioned by Conservation International (CI) in collaboration with ABCG members and development partners, is an evidence-based review of how implementers have integrated Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and freshwater ecosystem conservation to date in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The report takes stock of a selection of experiences from projects taking a more holistic approach to conservation and development.
File A Global Assessment of Community Based Natural Resource Management: Addressing the Critical Challenges of the Rural Sector by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 31, 2014 02:19 PM
CBNRM: AN ASSESSMENT WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE FUTURE. Rural development issues are critical not only for the rural areas themselves but also for addressing pressing global concerns of food security (FS), climate change, biodiversity conservation, poverty reduction, provision of environmental goods and services, and good governance. Community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) has been a rural development strategy for over 30 years. This paper has a two-fold objective: to assess the CBNRM experience in order to improve the performance of CBNRM itself, and to evaluate the lessons learned from CBNRM for critical issues – especially food security and climate change. Featured June, 2013
File A GLOBAL ASSESSMENT OF COMMUNITY BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: by Shreya Mehta — last modified Feb 01, 2014 02:34 PM
Rural development issues are critical not only for the rural areas themselves but also for addressing pressing global concerns of food security (FS), climate change, biodiversity conservation, poverty reduction, provision of environmental goods and services, and good governance. Community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) has been a rural development strategy for over 30 years. This paper has a two-fold objective: to assess the CBNRM experience in order to improve the performance of CBNRM itself, and to evaluate the lessons learned from CBNRM for critical issues – especially food security and climate change. CBNRM involves defined groups of local people collaborating on utilization and regulating use of natural resources. CBNRM is an approach to empowering rural communities with the knowledge, skills, and authority to sustainably manage natural resources (e.g., wildlife, rangelands, forests, fish, water, etc.). Successful CBNRM initiatives require sustainable natural resource management; benefit streams (financial, social, and economic) that exceed costs; and good governance. Although it is difficult to identify predictable sequences and blueprints for success, many principles of “good” CBNRM have been identified. Each program has its own historical and cultural context and that influence success. Adaptive management and a systems approach, to accommodate the interplay between the realities of the field and the application of principles, are needed. The principles, when applied in a rigorous, integrated, and systematic fashion, greatly improve the chances of successful CBNRM. The paper enumerates a range of these principles and cases where they have been applied with good results. A typology, from transformational to extractive, is presented as an informal tool to assist in the analysis of cases. There are many constraints – technical, economic, cultural, and governance-related – that impede success. A number are presented here with suggestions for overcoming them. Not all constraints are equal, however. A major common constraint is the lack of an appropriate rights framework, often combined with institutional arrangements that are complex, time consuming and costly for rural people. Communities are often put at a disadvantage because they are assigned management “rights” over low value resources that have no other claimants. The ability of CBNRM programs to have significant impacts on the economic growth of rural communities depends to a large extent on the value of the resource base, the distribution of rights over those resources, and the functioning of markets. These are not always aligned in the favor of local communities. CBNRM programs need to systematically analyze these elements along with transaction costs and opportunity costs, in order to understand the incentives and viability of CBNRM programs. Unfortunately, because they involve vested interests and politics, governance and rights constraints may be easier to identify than to change. The assessment revealed interesting examples of “collateral success,” the sometimes hidden improvements in livelihoods and the environment that occur in parallel or tangentially to the main objective of the CBNRM initiative. Collateral success, sometimes as important to local people as success at achieving the initial objective, stems from communities and groups applying the tools, institutions, and methods of CBNRM (such as mechanisms for coordination, planning, rulemaking and sanctions, economies of scale, partnerships, capacity building, advocacy and marketing, etc.) to other resource activities – particularly ones where communities have secure rights, such as livestock and agriculture. The West Gate Conservancy in Kenya, for example, has used the tools and capacity built for wildlife and ecotourism to better manage livestock through group herding, rotational grazing, range improvement, and better marketing. Local communities can be ingenious in their use of the CBNRM tools made X A GLOBAL ASSESSMENT OF COMMUNITY BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT available to them. Innovative and adaptive, monitoring and evaluation systems are needed to capture this creativity. Collateral success shows the importance of the CBNRM principles and best practices for the pressing challenges of food security and climate change. The critical threats of food shortages, insecurity, and climate change underline the urgency of improving agriculture and natural resources management. The principles, and the mechanisms, institutions, and tools of CBNRM can improve the performance of other rural sub-sectors and will be key to climate-smart agriculture, community-based adaptation, and rural resilience.
File Presentation - Makira Forest Protected Area, Madagascar: Linkages between biodiversity and REDD by LiLing Choo — last modified Jan 10, 2013 07:40 AM
File Briefing Paper - Twenty Five Years NFM History by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 07:42 AM
PDF A History of the USAID Forest Program.
File Integrating Biodiversity and Climate Change Adaptation in Activity Design by Gateway Web Editor — last modified Jan 30, 2018 09:54 AM
This brief provides recommendations that can be implemented at various stages of the USAID program cycle to achieve appropriate and effective integration. It should also be useful to other funding and implementing organizations. We focus primarily at the activity level, but scoping recommendations and approaches also apply to the project design (PAD) level. This brief is accompanied by four case studies of USAID activities with i) Biodiversity Conservation and Climate Change Adaptation in Activity Design funding, ii) Biodiversity Conservation funding only and iii) Climate Change Adaptation in Activity Design funding only. Approaches and best practices learned from those activities (in the Nepal, Southern Africa Regional, Ecuador, and Asia Regional missions) have informed this brief.
File ST1. Global Tourism - Achieving Sustainable Goals by Joseph Badash — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:02 AM
This manual is from a set of nine courses on Sustainable Tourism that have been developed by George Washington University as a result of compiling the lessons and best practices from the USAID Global Sustainable Tourism Alliance (GSTA) program, and other tourism development experiences. The courses train students, practitioners, donor agency representatives, and others working in related fields to understand and develop tourism and its role in international development. All the course materials are public access and also can be found inside the USAID NRM&D Learning Management Center. Your registration in these courses will allow you to actively participate in discussions of the material, and to take quizzes to check yourself for understanding at the end of each course. Each of the nine courses are offered free on a non-academic credit basis and offer a Certificate of Completion from USAID. Participants may take these courses to build your own knowledge of the field of tourism and development. The target audience for this manual, Global Tourism - Achieving Sustainable Goals, includes professionals working on tourism-related projects in developing countries, including staff from donor and government agencies, non-governmental organizations, consulting firms, universities, businesses, and other entities.
File ST4. Tourism Investment And Finance - Accessing Sustainable Funding And Social Impact Capital by Joseph Badash — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:02 AM
This Guide provides development practitioners with the information and tools necessary to successfully facilitate the financing of small-scale, sustainable tourism projects, and to transfer these skills to their clients and counterparts. it is designed to assist organizations and individuals working with micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises to conduct pre-feasibility studies, understand the market and financial analysis process, prepare investment briefs, identify potential sources of financing, understand how deals and joint ventures are structured, and work with governments to remove barriers to investment and provide broader access to credit. It also includes lessons learned from past experiences and successful efforts to facilitate sustainable investment and financing. This manual is from a set of nine courses on Sustainable Tourism that have been developed by George Washington University as a result of compiling the lessons and best practices from the USAID Global Sustainable Tourism Alliance (GSTA) program, and other tourism development experiences. The courses train students, practitioners, donor agency representatives, and others working in related fields to understand and develop tourism and its role in international development. All the course materials are public access and also can be found inside the USAID NRM&D Learning Management Center. Your registration in these courses will allow you to actively participate in discussions of the material, and to take quizzes to check yourself for understanding at the end of each course. Each of the nine courses are offered free on a non-academic credit basis and offer a Certificate of Completion from USAID. Participants may take these courses to build your own knowledge of the field of tourism and development. The target audience for this manual, Tourism Investment And Finance - Accessing Sustainable Funding And Social Impact Capital , includes professionals working on tourism-related projects in developing countries, including staff from donor and government agencies, non-governmental organizations, consulting firms, universities, businesses, and other entities.
File USAID's Biodiversity Conservation and Forestry Programs, 2013 Report by Portal Web Editor — last modified Apr 25, 2014 02:30 PM
USAID manages a diverse portfolio of projects that conserve biodiversity and sustain forests while advancing development, particularly for vulnerable people who rely on natural resources for their livelihoods. This annual report summarizes the Agency's work in this sector and its importance to human well-being, highlighting discrete and cumulative results in fiscal year (FY) 2012, and how FY 2012 funds were allocated for work in FY 2013.
File CFA News August 24, 2006 Vol 2 No 2 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:03 AM
In This Issue • News from the CFA! • Payment for Environmental Services: Some Thoughts! • Financial Corner: Doing Well by Doing Good: Interest in Socially Responsible Investing Rises • Links of Interest • Promoting Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) and Sustainable Financing for Rural Conservation and Development • For Laughs
CFA News August 24, 2006 Vol 2 No 2 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:03 AM
In This Issue • News from the CFA! • Payment for Environmental Services: Some Thoughts! • Financial Corner: Doing Well by Doing Good: Interest in Socially Responsible Investing Rises • Links of Interest • Promoting Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) and Sustainable Financing for Rural Conservation and Development • For Laughs
File LRCFP Quarterly Report Q4 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:04 AM
LRCFP Quarterly Report Q4. 1 OCTOBER – 31 DECEMBER 2008
File LRCFP Quarterly Report Q13 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:07 AM
LRCFP Quarterly Report Q13. JANUARY - MARCH 2011
File Semi-Annual Report 10/01/2001 - 03/31/2002 for World Wildlife Fund by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:28 AM
This report presents the activities of World Wildlife Fund under the Global Conservation Program including conservation of forests in the Southwest Amazon, Atlantic Forests, Forests of the Lower Mekong, Sulu Sulawesi Seas, Terai Arc, and Bering Sea ecoregions. World Wildlife Fund (WWF). 2002. Leader with associates cooperative agreement: Semi-annual report FY 2001. Washington, DC: WWF. 89 p.
File MISSION OF THE NATURE CONSERVANCY by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:28 AM
This report presents the activities of The Nature Conservancy under the Global Conservation Program. The Nature Conservancy (TNC). 2002. Global Biodiversity Conservation Program: Semi-annual report. Washington, DC: TNC. 73 p.
File The operation of the Enterprise for the Americas Facility and the Tropical Forest Conservation Act: Report to Congress. May 2002 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:29 AM
This annual report to Congress reports on the activities of the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative (EAI) and the Tropical Forest Conservation Act (TFCA).
File Biodiversity Conservation: A Guide For USAID Staff and Partners by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 11, 2013 03:36 PM
Biodiversity Conservation: A Guide For USAID Staff and Partners
File The Parks in Peril site consolidation scorecard: Lessons from protected areas in Latin American and the Caribbean by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:32 AM
This document produced by The Nature Conservancy presents information about the site consolidation process and reviews the lessons learned, accomplishments and challenges faced by the 37 sites of the Parks in Peril Program. It also provides recommendation
File A new agenda for forest conservation and poverty reduction: Making forest markets work for low-income producers by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 11, 2013 01:19 PM
This paper lays out a set of strategies to promote forest conservation in ways that positively contribute to local livelihoods and community development in low- and middle-income countries.
File GCP Evaluation Report by Portal Web Editor — last modified Sep 01, 2016 09:09 PM
The evaluation of USAID’s Global Conservation Program (GCP) described in this report was conducted between June 2007 and March 2008, through a Task Order under the Prosperity, Livelihoods, and Conserving Ecosystems (PLACE) Indefinite Quantity Contract (IQC). The GCP is a Leader with Associates (LWA) assistance mechanism that began in 1999, and funded six US-based non governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in biodiversity conservation to conduct site-level work in more than 25 specific landscapes and seascapes worldwide. The GCP partner NGOs are the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF), Conservation International (CI), Enterprise Works-VITA (EWV), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and World Wildlife Fund (WWF). The GCP’s central mandate focuses on achieving landscape-level conservation results in a representative selection of the world’s most biodiverse areas. The program also focuses on the sharing of lessons learned and conservation approaches between sites and among partners.
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