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Smartfolder for Amazon Basin Conservation Information and Deforestation

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 08:45 AM
Smartfolder for Amazon Basin Conservation Information (deforestation)
File Final Document: Nested Approaches to REDD+ by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:46 AM
An Overview of Issues and Options: Interest in “nested” approaches to REDD+ has grown steadily as policy makers, practitioners and investors seek to reconcile approaches to reducing, and rewarding, emissions reductions at different scales – national, subnational and project. The 16th session of the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC in Cancun marked the UNFCCC’s formal acknowledgement of subnational approaches to REDD+ accounting and monitoring. National “readiness” processes for REDD+ in many countries explicitly seek to incorporate nested projects or demonstration activities, as do state or provincial mechanisms under the Governors´ Task Force on Climate and Forests.
File BUILD Year 2 Annual Report: October 1, 2012 – September 30, 2013 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:22 PM
Between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013, Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) and partners implemented the second year of the USAID program: Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD). The program aims to harmonize the development of infrastructure with the maintenance of biodiversity in the Andes, Amazon, the Albertine Rift and the Himalayas.
File BUILD Year 3 Annual Report: October 1, 2013 – September 30, 2014 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:22 PM
Between October 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014, Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) and partners implemented the third year of the USAID program: Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD). The program aims to harmonize the development of infrastructure with the maintenance of biodiversity in the Andes, Amazon, the Albertine Rift and the Himalayas.
File BUILD Year 4 Annual Report: October 1, 2014 – September 30, 2015 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:22 PM
Between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015, Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) and partners implemented the fourth and final year of the USAID program: Biodiversity Understanding in Infrastructure and Landscape Development (BUILD). The program aims to harmonize the development of infrastructure with the maintenance of biodiversity in the Andes, Amazon, Albertine Rift and Himalayas regions. CSF has provided technical support to governments and stakeholders in the Andes-Amazon, Albertine Rift and Himalayas regions to incorporate biodiversity impacts into infrastructure planning, approval and implementation. Our activities have included training conservation professionals, media, and infrastructure developers and regulators how to analyze infrastructure projects and incorporate environmental and social costs and benefits; providing analysis tools so that these and other professionals can analyze infrastructure projects; making information about infrastructure development more readily available to the public; identifying infrastructure policy best practices and innovations; helping conservationists and affected people articulate their concerns in economic terms; and helping infrastructure developers and governments mitigate and compensate environmental and social costs and benefits in reality through the facilitation of appropriate financial mechanisms.
File Infrastructure and Conservation: The Case of a Pucallpa-Cruzeiro Do Sul Transport Link by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:23 PM
The project for a Pucallpa-Cruzeiro do Sul highway interconnection would represent the last section of what is known as the Central Interoceanic Highway (IOC), one of the primary roads in the package known as the Initiative for the Integration of the Regional Infrastructure of South America (IIRSA). is project risks generating significant environmental and social impacts. The project would pass through biologically rich areas of forest and river ecosystems near the Sierra del Divisor Reserved Zone and the Isconahua Territorial Reserve at the border with Brazil, as well as the native communities located within the project’s zone of influence.
File Costs and Benefits of the Inambari River Hydroelectric Project by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:23 PM
Tapping hydropower in the Andean slopes is a key feature in Brazil’s electricity strategy. In June 2010, the governments of Peru and Brazil signed an Energy Agreement that includes plans for hydroelectric plants in the Peruvian Amazon, intended primarily to generate power for export to Brazil. The Inambari River hydroelectric project, with an installed capacity of 2,200 megawatts, is the first of five possible projects to have a feasibility study conducted.
File Roads Filter: Identifying High-Risk Road Development in the Amazon Basin by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:23 PM
Over the past few decades, national and regional Amazonian governments have endorsed the rapid expansion of road construction. This attitude persists today and drives continued road integration plans within the region, for example, the Initiative for the Integration of South American Regional Infrastructure (Iniciativa para la Integración de la Infrestructura Regional Sudamericana: IIRSA). However, road development can bring high environmental costs and may accrue benefits to only a limited number of stakeholders. Within the region, roads have long been linked to deforestation; in the 1990’s 80% of all deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon occurred within 100 km of the five major road networks (Alves 2002). Deforestation leads to biodiversity loss, the displacement of indigenous and non-indigenous communities, the spread of disease, as well as global impacts such as increased greenhouse gas emissions and reduced carbon storage.
File Financial Mechanisms for Environmental Compliance in Infrastructure Projects: CSF Discussion Paper - Number 5: June 2013 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:24 PM
Energy and transportation infrastructure are building blocks of development. Energy is a key input to every industrial process, most agriculture and to the comfort of most people at all economic levels. Roads, railways and shipping permit trade, exploitation of comparative advantage and labor mobility. Governments, state banks and multilateral development banks play central roles in infrastructure projects, which have characteristics that deter free-market investment: long-term payoffs, substantial risk, natural monopolies and the notion that they provide services to which all people have a right, even if they cannot pay.
File Letter: A Global Strategy for Road Building by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:24 PM
The number and extent of roads will expand dramatically this century1. Globally, at least 25 million kilometres of new roads are anticipated by 2050; a 60% increase in the total length of roads over that in 2010. Nine-tenths of all road construction is expected to occur in develop- ing nations1, including many regions that sustain exceptional biodi- versity and vital ecosystem services. Roads penetrating into wilderness or frontier areas are a major proximate driver of habitat loss and frag- mentation, wildfires, overhunting and other environmental degrada- tion, often with irreversible impacts on ecosystems2–5. Unfortunately, much road proliferation is chaotic or poorly planned3,4,6, and the rate of expansion is so great that it often overwhelms the capacity of envi- ronmental planners and managers2–7. Here we present a global scheme for prioritizing road building. This large-scale zoning plan seeks to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development, by helping to increase agricul- tural production, which is an urgent priority given that global food demand could double by mid-century8,9. Our analysis identifies areas with high environmental values where future road building should be avoided if possible, areas where strategic road improvements could promote agricultural development with relatively modest environ- mental costs, and ‘conflict areas’ where road building could have size- able benefits for agriculture but with serious environmental damage. Our plan provides a template for proactively zoning and prioritizing roads during the most explosive era of road expansion in human history.
File Ecological Compensation to Address Environmental Externalities: Lessons from South American Case Studies by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:24 PM
Large development projects commonly cause damage to ecosystems, even after measures have been taken to avoid and reduce impacts on site. Governments are increasingly seeking to offset losses through ecological compensation programs to maintain overall levels of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Key to successful programs are criteria that reduce uncertainty and transaction costs while enhancing ecological equivalency. In South America, Brazil and Colombia have implemented compensation programs, and Peru has recently published broad guidelines and is developing detailed rules. Brazil emphasizes regulatory simplicity, which mitigates cost uncertainty, over ecological equivalence. Colombia has sophisticated methods for establishing ecological equivalence, but has yet to develop institutions necessary to reduce transaction costs. These experiences suggest a tradeoff between rules that rigorously compensate losses with ecologically equivalent areas, and simpler approaches that have low transaction costs but may fail to ensure specific biodiversity goals. The success of Peru’s system will depend on being practical enough to implement at scale and rigorous enough to deliver environmental benefits. We describe a series of mutually compatible recommendations to balance both needs. Ecological compensation is still a nascent effort in the neotropics and policy adjustments will be necessary as better information on success and failure becomes available.
File Improving Decision Making Through Valuing Local Ecosystem Services: São Luiz do Tapajós Hydroelectric Case by Portal Web Editor — last modified Aug 29, 2016 09:54 AM
Are we learning from our mistakes? | Common environmental and social costs on Amazon context
File Impactos Econômicos da Construção da Hidrelétrica de São Luiz do Tapajós ao Provimento de Serviços Ecossistêmicos Para a População Local e Regional by Portal Web Editor — last modified Aug 29, 2016 09:52 AM
Caso a AHE São Luiz do Tapajós seja construída, muitos serviços ecossistêmicos serão impactados, influenciando o bem estar de centenas de pessoas que deles dependem. A exemplo de experiências anteriores de construções de barragens, pode-se esperar que famílias realocadas e outras que a serem afetadas pelo aumento do desmatamento e por outros impactos aos serviços ecossistêmicos, terão uma diminuição no acesso aos mais variados produtos florestais madeireiros e não-madeireiros. Estas são importantes fontes de subsistência e de renda para dezenas de famílias. Além disso, devido à redução da qualidade de água a jusante da barragem a implantação deste empreendimento gerará custos adicionais aos municípios afetados. O aumento das emissões de gases de efeito estufa (gás carbônico e gás metano) poderá representar perda de fonte de renda de desmatamento evitado para alguns municípios. E a perda do principal atrativo turístico da região, trará impactos sobre áreas de lazer e recreação importantes para a população local.
File El Filtro de Carreteras: Un Análisis Estratégico de Proyectos Viales en la Amazonía by Portal Web Editor — last modified Aug 29, 2016 09:50 AM
El Filtro de Carreteras es una herramienta de análisis desarrollada por Conservación Estratégica para apoyar la conservación y el desarrollo sostenible. La herramienta utiliza un índice comparativo que considera implicaciones ambientales, económicas, sociales y culturales correspondientes a proyectos viales en la Amazonía. Esta herramienta puede utilizarse para informar a los tomadores de decisiones sobre los niveles de riesgo y los posibles impactos. En 2011 se aplicó el Filtro de Carreteras a 36 proyectos viales propuestos en la región.
File Costos y Beneficios del Proyecto Hidroeléctrico del Río Inambari by Portal Web Editor — last modified Aug 29, 2016 09:47 AM
El Acuerdo Energético firmado por los gobiernos de Perú y Brasil en junio de 2010, pero aún no aprobado por los respectivos congresos nacionales, prevé que compañías brasileñas construyan, en ríos de la Amazonía peruana, centrales hidroeléctricas para exportar energía al Brasil. El proyecto de central hidroeléctrica en el río Inambari, con una potencia instalada de 2.200 megavatios (MW), fue el primero de cinco posibles proyectos en contar con un estudio de factibilidad realizado por la compañía promotora, la Empresa de Generación Eléctrica Amazonas Sur (EGASUR).
File Análisis Económico y Socioambiental de los Proyectos de Interconexión Pucallpa-Cruzeiro do Sul by Portal Web Editor — last modified Aug 29, 2016 09:45 AM
Las grandes obras de infraestructura, como los proyectos de interconexión terrestre, juegan un rol estratégico para el desarrollo de las naciones. No obstante, muchas de estas obras se llevan a cabo sin que se pruebe previamente su e ciencia. La magnitud de las pérdidas que puede generar un proyecto con ausencia de condiciones necesarias para alcanzar su viabilidad económica, ambiental y social depende, en gran medida, de la región geográ ca donde se desarrolle. Así, los proyectos viales construidos en ecosistemas tropicales frágiles suelen estar asociados a altos costos económicos y ambientales.
File Pave the Impenetrable? An Economic Analysis of Potential Ikumba - Ruhija Road Alternatives in and Around Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park: CSF Technical Series No. 35 | April 2015 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jul 05, 2016 08:25 PM
In July 2012, the Ugandan government’s Uganda National Road Authority (UNRA) advertised the opportunity to design and construct 1,900 km of strategic roads in the country. One of these roads is the “Lot E.3: Hamurwa-Karere-Kanungu/Bulema-Buhoma-Butogota-Hamayan- ja-Ifasha-Ikumba” road project (UNRA, 2012), as included in Annex 1. Part of this project is the upgrade of a murram road1 between the Ikumba junction on the Kabale – Kisoro road and the town of Buhoma, the main hub for tourism in and around Bwindi Impenetrable National Park (BINP). BINP is a globally recognized UNESCO World Heritage Site, and one of the last remaining habitats of about half the world’s population of the critically endangered mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei), one of Uganda’s main tourist attractions. Approximately 13 km of the Ikumba – Buhoma road passes through the park and is currently the only access route from Kabale to the town of Ruhija. Given BINP’s importance to Uganda’s development and conservation objectives, the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP) and the Uganda Chapter of Poverty and Conservation Learning Group (Ug-PCLG) have proposed, in consultation with local communities and engineers, two alternative routes which bypass construction within BINP.
File Biodiversity conservation and forestry programs 2016 report, fiscal year 2015 results and funding by Gateway Web Editor — last modified Feb 26, 2018 10:15 AM
The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) submits this report pursuant to Section 118 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (FAA), as amended, on Tropical Forests. This report also relays important information related to Section 119 of the FAA on Endangered Species. This report highlights some of the results of recent investments, and the importance of how conservation is done with respect to building prosperity, security, and partnerships.
File Biodiversity conservation and forestry programs 2015 Report, fiscal year 2014 results and funding by Gateway Web Editor — last modified Oct 27, 2017 11:24 AM
The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) submits this report to fulfill the requirement for an annual report on implementation of Section 118 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (FAA),on Tropical Forests. This report also relays important information related to Section 119 of the FAA onEndangered Species.
File USAID’s Biodiversity Conservation and Forestry Programs, 2016 Annual Report by FRAME Administrator — last modified Feb 26, 2018 01:12 PM
In FY 2016, USAID field conservation programs improved natural resource management in highly biodiverse areas across more than 57 million hectares, an area about the size of Colorado and Nevada combined. As a result of USAID assistance, more than 1.5 million people have more income, better jobs, and other economic gains through sustainable natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Millions more benefit indirectly from biodiversity and the natural services it provides. Results from USAID funding around the world appear in this report. A selection of notable results and three in-depth project profiles serve to illustrate major approaches used by USAID and its partners.
Forest Carbon, Markets and Communities (FCMC) by Portal Web Editor — last modified Mar 07, 2019 02:38 PM
To support the United States Government's commitment to financing activities that reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, Tetra Tech ARD implemented the Forest Carbon, Markets and Communities (FCMC) project. FCMC supplied technical services on forest carbon to USAID in Washington, D.C., and bilateral and regional missions, particularly in the Andean Amazon.
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