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Disaster Preparedness and Management in Zambia: Lessons for Integrated Risk Management

by Portal Web Editor last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:08 AM
Contributors: Mr. Lovemore Simwanda

The Government of the Republic of Zambia recognises the fact that it is its fundamental responsibility to protect the lives and property of its citizens during a disaster. The Zambian government has in this regard made efforts to create response mechanisms to tackle disaster situations in the country once they occur "disaster" and its definitions continues to alter over time, in accordance with changing ideas and scenarios concerning the causes and effects. A generally accepted definition of a disaster is that: A disaster is serious disruption of the functioning of society, causing widespread or localised human, material or environmental losses, which exceed the liability of the affected society to cope using only its own resources. The key elements in the above definition are disruption of normal functions and inability to cope using available resources by the concerned community. Implied in the above statement is the fact that a disaster occurs when a trigger mechanism or hazard affects human beings and their welfare. The severity of a disaster is therefore linked to the level of vulnerability of the affected population. This in turn depends on the population's resilience to with stand the shocks or stresses of disaster impacts. That capacity is heavily influenced by the population's prevailing socio-economic conditions or asset portfolio. High vulnerability is almost invariably a function of poverty, a lack of resources, lack of assets, lack of access to institutions education and other means of support.

Author(s): Mr. Lovemore Simwanda

Location: Zambia

Download File from Portal: annex-ix-zambia-exp.pdf — PDF document, 103 kB (106,114 bytes)

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