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Conservation and Development Interventions at the Wildlife/Livestock Interface: Implications for Wildlife, Livestock and Human Health

by Sarah Schmidt last modified Jan 10, 2013 03:54 PM
Contributors: Osofsky, S. A., Cleaveland, S., Karesh, W. B., Kock, M. D., Nyhus, P. J., Starr, L., and A. Yang (Editors)

Wildlife conservation can be a ‘win-win’ land use of choice in today’s Africa Experts from East and Southern Africa have some grass roots ideas for tackling the immense challenges Africa faces at the interface between wildlife, domestic animal and human health — and they hope the West is listening. Around the world, domestic and wild animals are coming into ever-more intimate contact. Without adequate scientific knowledge and planning, the consequences can be detrimental on one or both sides of the proverbial fence. These interactions, often neglected, remain of critical importance to the long-term ecological and socio-political security of national parks and other protected areas and grazing lands worldwide. Whether talking about bovine tuberculosis in South Africa's Kruger National Park, or the brucellosis saga in Yellowstone National Park that is costing U.S. authorities millions of dollars to manage, these issues merit more attention than they have received to date. A 2005 book, Conservation and Development Interventions at the Wildlife/Livestock Interface: Implications for Wildlife, Livestock and Human Health, features some of the most innovative conservation thinking in Africa today and provides concrete examples of the significant role animal health plays in both environmental conservation and economic development. The publication, and the related initiative that the Wildlife Conservation Society, the IUCN Species Survival Commission Veterinary Specialist Group, and partners have helped launch (Animal Health for the Environment And Development or AHEAD), focus on several themes central to the future of wildlife, animal agriculture and people. These include competition over grazing and water resources, disease transmission, local and global food security, zoonoses (diseases transmitted from animals to humans), and other potential sources of conflict related to land-use decision-making and resource constraints. Addressing these issues is of critical importance to Africa’s people, its wildlife heritage, and to the continent’s global trading partners. Animal health issues, and their implications for human health and livelihoods, must be addressed by regional development or conservation strategies — including those involving transboundary ‘peace parks’— if they are to succeed. Few cross-sectoral solutions have been offered until the publication of this book. “We hope that conservation and development colleagues from within and, as importantly, outside of the health science professions will find this volume thought-provoking, insightful, practical, and applicable to their daily work,” says Dr. Steve Osofsky, Senior Policy Advisor for Wildlife Health for the Wildlife Conservation Society, World Conservation Union (IUCN) Veterinary Specialist Group member, and the book’s editor. “As socioeconomic progress demands sustained improvements in health for humans, their domestic animals, and the environment, we hope we’ve been successful in drawing attention to the need to move towards a ‘one health’ perspective— an approach that is the foundation of our conservation work, and a theme pervading this unique volume,” he added.

Author(s): Osofsky, S. A., Cleaveland, S., Karesh, W. B., Kock, M. D., Nyhus, P. J., Starr, L., and A. Yang (Editors)

Publication Date: 2005

Location: Africa

Download File from Portal: AHEADbook6.5MB.pdf — PDF document, 6,691 kB (6,852,302 bytes)

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