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Sustainable Pastoralism: Opportunities for Rural and International Development, Conservation, Resilience, Disaster Risk Reduction, and Conflict Mitigation

Sustainable Pastoralism: Opportunities for Rural and International Development, Conservation, Resilience, Disaster Risk Reduction, and Conflict Mitigation
by Portal Web Editor last modified Jul 30, 2014 07:09 PM
Contributors: Pablo Manzano
IUCN

Pastoralism is the most extensive livelihood in marginal lands, comprising drylands, mountains and the world's cold areas. The relationship between healthy soils, biodiversity conservation and sustainable animal husbandry practices, invariably linked with adequate forms of governance on land use, has been well-established, both in developed and in developing economies. However, governments tend to ignore or negate this evidence, and pastoralist lands are prone to chronic insecurity and conflict problems (such as Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa or the Saharo-Sahelian region), or from food crises - the latter often related to barriers to mobility. The WISP Programme of IUCN has reviewed the links between these factors and its consequences to facilitate global learning and better integrated understanding of pastoralist systems. Best practices have also been identified, such as allowing traditional activities in conservation areas or the establishment of Indigenous Communities’ Conservation Areas. The work done in networking with pastoralist collectives can also facilitate a fruitful dialogue at the local, national, regional and global level. Featured April, 2013.

Author(s): Pablo Manzano

Publication Date: 2013

Location: Washington, D.C.

Download File from Portal: WISP - USAID presentation March 6th 2013 reduced size.pdf — PDF document, 2,175 kB (2,227,565 bytes)

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