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Highlands Agricultural Development Project: Final impact evaluation, combined report

by Portal Web Editor last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:10 AM
Contributors: USAID

This report derives from the final USAID evaluation of the Highlands Agricultural Development Project II (HAD II), the third component of a long-term USAID effort in Guatemala initiated in 1983 and continuing via the Community Natural Resources Management (NRM) Project. The goal of HAD II was to help small farms in the highlands to integrate more fully into the Guatemalan economy. The planned cost for HAD II was US$ 32 million. The major effect of the project was a shift towards commercial crops, resulting in an income increase for 2/3 (~1500) of participating farmers. One third of the farmers felt that their situation became worse because of the debts from the installation of the irrigation system, electricity charges and difficulties in finding markets for their products. The author recommends the following for future AID NRM investments: Projects should concentrate on smaller geographical areas, with more money and technical assistance per unit area; Agricultural projects should be planned for the long term: a gap in the planning and funding of HAD II and its predecessors, resulted in a crucial loss of momentum; USAID officials should closely oversee initial phases, especially survey designs; Local agricultural technicians should be trained in marketing, credit procedures, and how to organize farmers groups; In order for farmers to be willing to invest time and other limited resources in afforestation, they must be able to see concrete benefits almost immediately.

Author(s): USAID

Publication Date: 1998

Location: Guatemala

Download File from Portal: PDABI939 Guate HAD2.pdf — PDF document, 6,440 kB (6,595,090 bytes)

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