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CBNFM Australia

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:11 AM
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File World directory of country environmental studies: An annotated bibliography of natural resource profiles, plans, and strategies, 3rd Edition by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:07 PM
KEYWORD: Community-based Natural Forest Management, World. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Australia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Africa. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Asia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Central America. Community-based Natural Forest Management, South America. Bibliography
File Whither the people? Demographic, tenurial, and agricultural aspects of the tropical forestry action plan. Center for International Development and Environment by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:07 PM
KEYWORD: Community-based Natural Forest Management, World. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Africa. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Asia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Australia. Africa, Asia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Tanzania, agricultural diversification, forest enterprises, industrial forestry, sustainable forestry, swidden agriculture, agroforestry, shifting cultivation, forest concession, land tenure, policy, property rights, community participation, customary rules, equity, indigenous land, evaluation, forestry action plan, lessons learned. SUMMARY: The FAO-coordinated Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP) has been developed as a means of promoting sustainable development while slowing deforestation, and it has been promoted globally by the World Resources Institute. Development and implementation of TFAPs has raised important demographic, tenurial, and agricultural issues, which are highlighted in this report. Globally, the importance of knowledge and sensitivity regarding forest-dependant cultures is underestimated and these peoples are often politically invisible. Currently, TFAP guidelines do not call for demographic or cultural information and many plans are produced without consideration of the diversity among these groups. Many countries do not give land tenure to forest communities or recognize traditional property rights despite the fact that this leads individuals to not invest in sustainable management. Sentiment is changing, however, and the importance of land tenure has begun to be recognized internationally. The author suggests that this recognition be expanded such that communities are compensated with a portion of all revenues generated by forest concessions and development projects implemented on their traditional lands. Policies regarding swidden farmers continue to oversimplify their agricultural practices. The author describes differences between integraluote and non-integral swiddeners: the first group uses multiple species and intimate knowledge of local conditions, while the second usually farms in a migratory way such that local conditions are not heeded. Integrated swidden farming is sustainable, while non-integrated often is not, yet these two forms are considered alike in typical government policies. Oversights such as this hinder the successful development of TFAPs and related policies in most tropical countries. The author recommends that attention should be given to each of these issues as essential to promoting successful, sustainable forest management. Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Tanzania are highlighted as hopeful examples since they have shown exceptional awareness of the needs of forest-dependent communities while adopting TFAPs.
File What makes for success?: NGO community forestry workshop report by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 28, 2013 01:56 AM
KEYWORD: Community-based Natural Forest Management, Asia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Australia. Asia, China, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, community forestry, governance, institutional collaboration, institutions, NGO, policy, communication, community participation, social learning, lessons learned, workshop. SUMMARY: This document presents the proceedings of a June 1991 workshop organized by the FAO, the Local Development Institute, and the World Resources Institute in Bangkok, Thailand. The goal of the workshop was to generate greater understanding about experiences, constraints, and opportunities in CBNFM initiatives in Asia and the integration of CBNFM into government policies. Participants included CBNFM leaders from China, Fiji, India, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Major topics addressed in the workshop included:Defining community forestry and the key issues surrounding its practice; NGOs strengths and weaknesses, particularly those related to CBNFM projects; The role of government agencies, policies and practice in supporting or hindering community forestry projects; The role of international organizations (both transnational NGOs and development assistance agencies). The workshop concluded that key elements of successful CBNFM programs include: Government agencies and NGOs cooperation in supporting local development processes; NGOs' and community forestry programs' responsiveness to locally-identified and prioritized needs; Control and management of resources by and for the benefit of local peoples; Community-initiated assessment and evaluation; Legitimizing and strengthening local institutions and NGOs and promoting self-reliance.
File Final programmatic environmental assessment: Sustainable forestry program for Papua New Guinea, the Soloman Islands, and Vanuatu by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:07 PM
KEYWORD: Community-based Natural Forest Management, Asia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Australia. Asia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Soloman Islands, Vanutau, community forestry, industrial forestry, logging, market development, sustainable forestry, biodiversity, deforestation, land use, soil conservation, watershed, extension, education, environmental assessment. SUMMARY: In Melanesia, commercial logging has decimated large expanses of forest at the expense of communities that have traditionally depended on forest products. In 1991, the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific (FSP) initiated a program for sustainable community forestry that entailed the use of reduced impact logging methods and small-scale, portable saw mills. The programmatic environmental assessment (PEA) of the program was conducted according to USAID requirements. The PEA analyzed two alternatives: implementation and no implementation of the program. The assessment addressed soil and water resources, forest vegetation, flora and fauna biological diversity, socio-economics, training and extension services, and wood production and marketing. The PEA found that there would be no significant environmental impacts associated with the planned sustainable forestry program as long as safeguards and tree planting mitigation measures were followed and monitoring was conducted diligently. A course of no action would result in many environmental impacts, since industrial logging would then continue unchecked. The authors recommend the following to improve project performance: Harvest planning and designation of conservation zones; Expanding FSP programs by increasing the number of sawmills included and by improving sustainable forestry prescriptions; Training and extension; Land use planning, Market studies to determine means of increasing the profitability of forestry;Increased research of logging impacts on forests,Monitoring and evaluation.
File Community-based natural resources management: An annotated bibliography by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:08 PM
KEYWORD: Community-based Natural Forest Management, World. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Africa. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Asia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Central Amercia. Community-based Natural Forest Management, South America. Community-based Natural Forest Management, Australia. Africa, Asia, Central America, South America, bibliography.
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