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Conflict Assessment and Management Tools

by Portal Web Editor last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
Toolkit on Livelihoods and Conflict by webadmin — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
This toolkit is par t of a series that explores how development assistance can address key risk factors associated with conflict. It shows how violent conflict can affect individual and community access to essential resources and how an approach that focuses on strengthening that access can help people sur vive and recover from conflict. Livelihoods, or individuals' or households' access to resources, is often a primary factor in motivating violence. In some cases, if livelihood support is offered early enough, conflict may be avoided. This document is intended to provide USAID mission staff, their par tners, and others working in countries affected by conflict and instability with: 1) an examination of the relationship between conflict and people's livelihoods; 2) lessons in developing livelihoods programs-- including an introduction to livelihood analysis; 3) a range of program options designed to reduce livelihood vulnerability, strengthen resiliency, and help people manage conflict-related shocks; and 4) listings of relevant USAID mechanisms, implementing partners, and contact information. 2005.
link to Water and Conflict (Toolkit) by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
File Livelihoods and Conflict: A TOOLKIT FOR INTERVENTION by webadmin — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
This toolkit is par t of a series that explores how development assistance can address key risk factors associated with conflict. It shows how violent conflict can affect individual and community access to essential resources and how an approach that focuses on strengthening that access can help people sur vive and recover from conflict. Livelihoods, or individuals' or households' access to resources, is often a primary factor in motivating violence. In some cases, if livelihood support is offered early enough, conflict may be avoided. This document is intended to provide USAID mission staff, their par tners, and others working in countries affected by conflict and instability with: 1) an examination of the relationship between conflict and people's livelihoods; 2) lessons in developing livelihoods programs-- including an introduction to livelihood analysis; 3) a range of program options designed to reduce livelihood vulnerability, strengthen resiliency, and help people manage conflict-related shocks; and 4) listings of relevant USAID mechanisms, implementing partners, and contact information. 2005.
File Land and Conflict: A Key Issues Lessons Learned Program Options Resources by webadmin — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
The purpose of this toolkit is to provide a practical introduction to the relationship between land and violent conflict. The relationship is stark, whether we are talking about how land issues function as causal or aggravating factors in conflict, or whether we are thinking about land-related issues that arise in post-conflict settings. The toolkit is also designed to familiarize practitioners with a range of relevant programmatic interventions and to sensitize officers to the fact that development activities, including non-land related interventions, such as infrastructure projects and the exploitation of underground resources, can inadvertently cause land conflicts to erupt. As with many issues addressed in this series, land issues are a general development concern from the perspective of economic growth, governance, and the environment. However, land is also a critical 'prize' in many local and national power struggles, and any development initiative needs to be aware of this fact. The lead authors have therefore attempted to inspire creative thinking and encourage short-term action around land related conflicts, as well as capture the relevance of land to long-term development issues. The toolkit emphasizes the critical point that land issues must be approached systematically and that, in many contexts, sequencing and process are critical not only to the sustainability of programs but also to broader issues of stability. In that regard, this document also addresses 'doing no harm' and land-related programming.
File CONDUCTING A CONFLICT ASSESSMENT: A Framework for Strategy and Program Development by webadmin — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
...USAID is acutely aware of the fact that stability no longer characterizes our operating environment and that our assistance needs to adapt to that change. In recognition of this fact, conflict management and mitigation has been designated as an Agency priority and the Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation (CMM) was established to provide technical leadership to Missions, implementing partners, regional and pillar bureaus, and other USG agencies working in conflict-prone environments. A key part of CMM's mandate is to integrate or 'mainstream' best practices in conflict management into more traditional development sectors such as agriculture, natural resource management, economic growth, democracy, education, and health.... April 2005.
File Minerals & Conflict: A TOOLKIT FOR INTERVENTION by webadmin — last modified Jan 10, 2013 12:10 PM
This toolkit is part of a series that explores how development assistance can address key risk factors associated with conflict. One area that is receiving increasing attention is the relationship between natural resources and violence. In many recent conflicts, valuable or scarce resources - land, water, timber, or minerals have played a central role in both causing and sustaining violence. In particular, valuable minerals took center stage after ‘conflict diamonds’ or ‘blood diamonds’, became a prominent feature of Sierra Leone’s civil war. Unfortunately, competition over coltan in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has followed a similarly brutal course. This toolkit: 1) examines the relationship between valuable minerals, such as diamonds or coltan, and violence; 2) discusses lessons learned in developing programs to deal with ‘conflict commodities’; 3) presents a range of program options; 4) provides a survey instrument that identifies key questions related to minerals and conflict; and 5) identifies relevant USAID mechanisms and implementing partners. Monitoring and evaluation tools are being developed. Together, the elements of this toolkit are designed to help raise awareness about the linkages among valuable minerals, development assistance, and conflict; and to assist officers integrate a conflict perspective into their development programming.
File Forests and Conflict – Key Issues and Lessons Learned by webadmin — last modified Feb 14, 2013 03:16 AM
This briefing paper explores the links between forests and violent conflict, focusing on five aspects: (1) the use of timber to finance violent conflict; (2) forests as battlegrounds for armed groups, (3) the contribution of logging to lower-scale conflicts; (4) the contribution of poor governance to conflict, and (5) impacts of conflicts on forest ecosystems. It builds on the 2003 USAID-commissioned study by ARD, Inc., on “Conflict Timber: Dimensions of the Problem in Asia and Africa” (Thomson and Kanaan 2003). However, this briefing paper reflects additional lessons from South America, which was not covered in ARD, Inc.’s study. By elaborating on possible options for addressing forest and conflict, this paper complements the continuing efforts of the U.S. government to examine the role of forest resources in people’s livelihoods, regional stability, and the world’s climate. Two of the most notable USAID initiatives dealing with forests and conflict are the 1995 Central African Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE), which paved the way for the 2002 Congo Basin Forest Partnership. Together, these two initiatives sought to save the Congo Basin’s forests while fostering sustainable development. More recently, the U.S. Presidential Initiative Against Illegal Logging, announced in July 2003, seeks to address the problem of illegal logging by facilitating good governance, community-based actions, and technology transfer. This paper explicitly draws on practical examples from USAID and other development agencies, and suggests a framework that USAID missions could use to analyze and address issues of forests and conflict in developing countries around the world.
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