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Poverty Reduction Tools Collection

by portaladmin last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:50 AM
File A History of the Social Development Network in The World Bank by Portal Web Editor — last modified Feb 05, 2013 01:42 AM
The Social Development Strategy will provide definitions and directions for the World Bank’s future work in Social Development. But to develop the Strategy it is necessary to understand both the history of the Social Development network within the Bank and the work it currently supports. This report provides such a history. It describes the origins of the network and the issues it has tackled in the past; and it does so on the assumption that knowing where we have come from and what we have done will help us decide what we should do in the future. Published in March 2004 by the World Bank Social Development Department.
File Beyond the City: Rural Economy's Contribution Development by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:09 AM
THE DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES AND COMMUNITIES IS PIVOTAL TO national well-being. In Latin American and Caribbean history, rural societies have been at the center of both the origins of prosperity and of social upheaval. Rural communities have access to a wealth of natural resources, including arable land and forests, yet they face the highest poverty rates in their countries. Characterized by low population densities and located far from the major urban centers, rural communities must overcome severe restrictions in access to public services and private markets, even in some countries where public expenditures per inhabitant are higher in rural than in urban communities. While the trade tax structure of the import-substitution industrialization epoch historically discriminated against the stereotypical rural economic activities related to agriculture, farmers nowadays enjoy higher trade protection than the average for manufacturing activities, along with significant government subsidies to specific producer groups in most Latin American and Caribbean economies. But the rural development challenge has again emerged in relation to concerns regarding agriculture's place in international trade negotiations. Specifically, there are questions of both extended market access for the most competitive agricultural subsectors in national economies and of longer transition periods towards liberalization and support for less competitive or "sensitive" subsectors. Also, many countries are reconsidering their-at least at this date-ineffective policies to support the development of laggard regions, which have not benefited significantly either in the protectionist periods or in the recent period of trade opening.
File Capitalisation and sharing of experiences on the interaction between forest policies and land use by Shreya Mehta — last modified Jan 22, 2013 02:22 PM
More productive and sustainable use of sloping land and community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) are being recognised increasingly as major options in a range of natural resource sectors in Asia. CBNRM is also recognised as a useful mechanism in cross-cutting strategies; for example in poverty reduction initiatives, environmental management, and rural development. The workshop held in Godavari, near Kathmandu, Nepal, from 26-28 January 2005, brought together over 60 participants; they included policy-makers, project implementers, and representatives of local communities from Bhutan, China, India, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, and Thailand; and representatives from two donor agencies – the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation (SDC) and German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)—and three international organisations – the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), the Regional Community Forestry Training Centre for Asia and the Pacific (RECOFTC), and the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) – to share the lessons learned from community forestry in Nepal and to explore opportunities for using them in other countries and for other natural resource types.
File Community-Based Marine Sanctuaries in the Philippines: A Report on Focus Group Discussions by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:59 AM
Crawford, B., M. Balgos, and C.R. Pagdilao. 2000. Community-Based Marine Sanctuaries in the Philippines: A Report on Focus Group Discussions. Coastal Management Report #2224. PCAMRD Book Series No. 30. Coastal Resources Center, University of Rhode Island and the Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development. Narragansett, Rhode Island USA. 40pp plus annexes.
Course Schedule by Portal Web Editor — last modified Sep 25, 2018 08:15 PM
File Does Conserving Biodiversity Work to Reduce Poverty: A State of Knowledge Review by Sue Hoye — last modified Apr 06, 2017 03:41 PM
File Does Conserving Biodiversity Work to Reduce Poverty? A State of Knowledge Review by Michael Colby — last modified Aug 20, 2013 05:04 PM
A meta-review of 400+ documents for empirical evidence about the role of biodiversity conservation as a mechanism for poverty reduction. Ten different types of conservation mechanisms were found with some level of evidence. The highest amount of evidence of poverty benefits were found to come from nature tourism and fish sanctuary spillover, followed by agro-forestry, mangrove restoration, and agrobiodiversity. Lower amounts of evidence were found for non-timber forest products (NTFPs-despite many studies), community timber enterprises (ditto), payments for environmental services (PES, a relatively new but fast-growing field), protected area jobs, and grasslands management. The Literature Cited lists about 100 of the studies reviewed, but the "associated website" is a link to a spreadsheet containing the full list of 400+ studies reviewed.
File Escaping poverty and becoming poor by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:26 AM
Three hundred and sixteen households in 20 western Kenyan villages - 19% of all households in these villages - managed successfully to escape from poverty in the last 25 years. However, another 325 households, (i.e., 19%) of all households of these villages, fell into abiding poverty in the same period. Different causes are associated with households falling into poverty and those overcoming poverty. Separate policies will be required consequently to prevent descent and to promote escape in future. Results from these 20 Kenyan villages are compared with results obtained earlier from a similar inquiry conducted in 35 villages of Rajasthan, India. Some remarkable similarities are found, but also several important differences.
File Evidence of Payments for Ecosystem Services as a mechanism for supporting biodiversity conservation and rural livelihoods by Michael Colby — last modified Mar 23, 2015 03:57 PM
Abstract: Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) represent a mechanism for promoting sustainable management of ecosystem services, and can also be useful for supporting rural development. However, few studies have demonstrated quantitatively the benefits for biodiversity and rural communities resulting from PES. In this paper we review four initiatives in Guatemala, Cambodia, and Tanzania that were designed to support the conservation of biodiversity through the use of community-based PES. Each case study documents the utility of PES for conserving biodiversity and enhancing rural livelihoods and, from these examples, we distill general lessons learned about the use of PES for conserving biodiversity and supporting poverty reduction in rural areas of tropical, developing countries.
File From Microfinance to Macro Change: Integrating Health Education and Microfinance to Empower Women and Reduce Poverty by Stanzin Tonyot — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:01 AM
Published by Microcredit Summit Campaign, UNPF, 2006 440 1st Street, NW Suite 460 Washington, DC 20001 202-637-9600 www.microcreditsummit.org The time has come for action. This document calls on development agencies, governments, microfinance institutions (MFIs), and donors to help realize the goal of health and equal opportunity for all by investing in strategies with proven impact on the problem of global poverty and poor health. It proposes one specific strategy that acknowledges the intimate relationship between poverty and poor health, and has proven impacts for very large numbers of the poor and very poor1. This proposed strategy is the combination of microfinance and reproductive health education.
File HYOGO FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION 2005-2015 Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters: MID-TERM REVIEW, 2010-2011 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Sep 04, 2013 08:25 PM
This report presents the findings of the Mid-Term Review of the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) aimed at critically analyzing the extent to which HFA implementation has progressed and at helping countries and their institutional partners identify practical measures to increase commitment, resourcing, and efforts in its further implementation.
File Interactions between HIV/AIDS and the Environment A Review of the Evidence and Recommendations for Next Steps by Anna Woltman — last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:58 AM
This report presents a broad review of the published literature regarding the potential links between HIV/AIDS and the environment to assess the evidence for these connections and to provide guidance for possible next steps in addressing them through basic or operations research and intervention. 2010
File Millennium Challenge Account - US DOS by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:00 AM
ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES: the U.S. Department of State electronic journal, Volume 8, Number 2. (March 2003.)
File Namibia USFS IP Trip Report: MCC Namibia Tourism Due Diligence, Social and Environmental Assessment; Mar 07 by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:57 AM
US Forest Service Technical Assistance: MCC Namibia Tourism Due Diligence, Social and Environmental Assessment
File NATURE, WEALTH, & POWER 2.0: Leveraging Natural and Social Capital for Resilient Development (2013) by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 23, 2016 08:51 PM
This volume is a sequel to the original Nature, Wealth, & Power framework paper (NWP1), produced in 2002. That document, although focused on rural Africa, was found useful by a variety of development practitioners around the world, and elicited significant interest from different disciplines and regions from both practical and theoretical perspectives. The world context has changed since 2002, and development theory and practice have also evolved. Therefore, in 2012, USAID initiated an assessment and updating of the NWP framework. This second framework paper (NWP2) is targeted at practitioners involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of natural resource–based rural development activities around the world, trying to make them more equitable, efficient, and effective. We also hope it will be useful to policy makers who are designing policies, laws, and administrative instruments to spur rural development. It does not claim to be a sure-fire recipe for success, but is an updated framework compiled from and consisting of best practices. Featured January, 2014.
File Nature, Wealth, Power 2.0: Leveraging Natural and Social Capital for Resilient Development by Sue Hoye — last modified Apr 06, 2017 03:41 PM
This volume is a sequel to the original Nature, Wealth, & Power framework paper (NWP1), produced in 2002. That document, although focused on rural Africa, was found useful by a variety of development practitioners around the world, and elicited significant interest from different disciplines and regions from both practical and theoretical perspectives. The world context has changed since 2002, and development theory and practice have also evolved. Therefore, in 2012, USAID initiated an assessment and updating of the NWP framework. This second framework paper (NWP2) is targeted at practitioners involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of natural resource–based rural development activities around the world, trying to make them more equitable, efficient, and effective. We also hope it will be useful to policy makers who are designing policies, laws, and administrative instruments to spur rural development. It does not claim to be a sure-fire recipe for success, but is an updated framework compiled from and consisting of best practices. Featured January, 2014.
File Paradise Lost?: Lessons from 25 years of USAID Environment Programs in Madagascar (Final Report) by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Jul 30, 2014 08:53 PM
(Final Report) The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) was one of the major supporters of environmental conservation programs in Madagascar for a quarter-century. Recent political changes put this investment at risk. What can policymakers and field practitioners learn from this experience about the fragility of development success? USAID commissioned International Resources Group (IRG) to produce a retrospective of its Madagascar programs and their evolution over the years. Long-time practitioner Karen Freudenberger interviewed dozens of individuals and reviewed scores of documents in telling this tale. The result is a comprehensive overview of USAID environmental interventions in Madagascar, and highlights important lessons for all who are interested in conservation and sustainability. Featured in News: USAID RM Portal Featured Stories on July 21, 2010.
File Payments for environmental services and poverty alleviation by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 11:36 AM
This paper examines the main ways in which Payments for Environmental Services (PES) might affect poverty. PES may reduce poverty mainly by making payments to poor natural resource managers in upper watersheds. The extent of the impact depends on how many PES participants are in fact poor, on the poor's ability to participate, and on the amounts paid. Although PES programs are not designed for poverty reduction, there can be important synergies when program design is well thought out and local conditions are favorable. Possible adverse effects can occur where property rights are insecure or if PES programs encourage less labor-intensive practices.
File SEAGA Macro Level Handbook by Rose Hessmiller — last modified Aug 31, 2013 06:28 PM
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations SEAGA Socio-Economic and Gender Analysis Programme
File TransLinks Annual Report for 2008 by Anna Woltman — last modified Jan 27, 2013 05:04 PM
A Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society in partnership with the Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC) of the Earth Institute (EI) at Columbia University, Enterprise Works/VITA (EWV), Forest Trends (FT), and the Nelson Institute/Land Tenure Center (NI/LTC) at the University of Wisconsin supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).
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