Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
 

2008/9 Katoomba XIII Meeting - Taking Stock and Charting a Way Forward for Payments for Ecosystem Services in Africa A Meeting of the East & Southern Africa Katoomba Group (Dar-es-salaam and Morogoro, Tanzania)

by Rose Hessmiller last modified Jan 10, 2013 10:49 AM
Contributors: The Katoomba Group, Forest Trends
The Katoomba Group, Forest Trends
September 16-18, 2008, Dar-es-salaam, Tanzania and September 18-20, 2008, Morogoro, Tanzania - This 2008 East and Southern African Katoomba Group meeting was hosted by the Katoomba Group and Forest Trends, with support from USAID through the TransLinks Cooperative Agreement.

Workshop banner

OVERVIEW

Previous regional Katoomba meetings in Uganda (2005) and South Africa (2006) demonstrated that Africans have become increasingly interested in market-based conservation strategies, including payments for ecosystem services (PES). While a number of projects are underway, PES in the East and Southern African region primarily occurs on an ad hoc basis through small-scale pilot projects. Information, capacity to design and manage PES deals, and institutions to support on-the-ground implementation are all lacking and have hindered efforts to scale up.

Yet, carbon markets, both regulated and voluntary, have grown very rapidly and offer opportunities for new investment in rural regions of Africa. The emergence of opportunities for Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) makes it even more important for the countries to build their capacity in order to put in place a readiness strategy. In addition, East and Southern African nations face a range of water-related challenges, including pollution and threats to reliable flows from forested catchments.

The 2008 East and Southern African Katoomba Group meeting offered an opportunity to dicuss development of both REDD readiness strategies as well as payment for watershed services schemes. The meeting will also provide hands-on capacity building combined with strategy discussions about scaling PES up in the region.

Katoomba XIII Agenda Picture

PUBLIC MEETING - September 16-17, White Sands Hotel and Resort, Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

Objective - Introduce the current state of play of markets and payments for ecosystem services (PES), highlighting the potential of PES to conserve the environment and improve livelihoods in East and Southern Africa.

Time    Description

8:00 9:00 AM

  REGISTRATION & PES POSTER SESSION

9:00 9:20

  WELCOME & CONFERENCE OPENING

Morning Plenary Moderated by: Paul Barker, country director, CARE International in Tanzania

  • Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group
  • Alice Ruhweza, Coordinator, East & Southern Africa Katoomba Group
  • Dr. Herman Mwageni, Country Representative, WWF Tanzania Program Office
 

9:20 - 9:30

  INSTITUTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR PES INVESTMENTS AND OPERATIONS

9:30 - 9:45

  KEYNOTE SPEECH

  • Using Market-based Approaches to Conserve the Environment and Reduce Poverty  - Dr. Batilda Salha Burian, Minister of State in the Vice-President’s Office – Environment, TANZANIA

9:45 - 11:10

  Panel 1: CARBON FINANCE

Moderated by: Angelina Madete, Vice President's Office, Division of Environment, Tanzania

  • Global Overview of Carbon Finance - Kate Hamilton, Forest Trends, Ecosystem Marketplace
  • The Potential for REDD in Tanzania - Felician Kilahama, Department of Forestry and Bee Keeping, Tanzania
  • The Norwegian Forestry/Climate Project and the Tanzania-Norway Forest Climate
  • Partnership - Ivar Jorgensen, Royal Norwegian Embassy, Tanzania
  • REDD: The Experience from Bolivia - Joerg Seifert-Granzin, FAN Bolivia
  • Opportunities & Challenges for Forestry and Land Use Change in the CDM - Richard Muyungi, Vice-President’s Office, Division of the Environment
 

Questions and Discussion

11:10 - 1:30

  BREAK

11:30 - 2:30 pm

  PANEL 1: CARBON FINANCE (continued)

  • Opportunities for Forestry and Land Use Change in the Voluntary Carbon Market - Bill Farmer, Uganda Carbon Bureau
  • Can Carbon Finance help solve Africa’s Charcoal Problem? - Geoffrey Odhiambo, Energy for Sustainable Development, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Sustainable Charcoal Production in Ghana - John Mason, National Research Council, Ghana

Questions and Discussion (15 minutes)

12:30 - 1:30

  LUNCH

1:30 - 3:00

  PANEL 2: PAYMENTS FOR WATERSHED SERVICES

Moderated by: Balaram Thapa, CARE International, Tanzania

  • Global Overview of Payments for Watershed Services - Mark Kieser, Kieser & Associates
  • The Equitable Payments for Watershed Services project, Tanzania - Dosteus Lopa, CARE Tanzania
  • Green Water Credits in Kenya - Sjef Kaufmann, ISRIC, Netherlands
  • Water Markets and Community in Mexico - Teresita Amezcua-Jaeger, Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición, Mexico
  • The SAB Miller Water Neutral Initiative - Phocus Lasway, Tanzania Breweries/SAB Miller, Tanzania

Questions and Discussion (15 minutes)

3:00  3:20

  BREAK

3:20 - 4:35

  PANEL 3: PAYMENTS FOR BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Moderated by: Dr. George Jambiya, WWF Tanzania Program Office

  • Putting Ecosystems on the Map: The Natural Capital Project - Taylor Ricketts, WWF-US and the Natural Capital Project
  • Valuing the Eastern Arc- A Biodiversity Hotspot - Shadrack Mwakalila, WWF Tanzania
  • Neil Burgess, University of Cambridge, UK Opportunities for PES in Joint Forestry and Wildlife Management Areas - Hussein Sosovele, WWF Tanzania
  • Wildlife Corridors in Kitengela, Kenya - Thomas Yatich, ICRAF
 

Questions and Discussion 

4:35 - 4:50

  HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PES ASSESSMENT IN EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

Alice Ruhweza, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group

4:50 - 5:15

  PES: AN INSIDE PERSPECTIVE FROM CHINA

Nuyun Li, State Forestry Administration, China

Questions and Discussion

5:15 - 6:15

  INTER-STAKEHOLDER PANEL DISCUSSION:HOW CAN WE MAKE BETTER PROGRESS ON PES?

Moderated by: Michael Jenkins, Forest Trends

  • Buyer Perspectives: Msafiri Phillip Wambua, Nairobi Water Company
  • Community (Seller) Perspectives : Pascal Nfuru, Kibungo Juu Community Environment Officer, Uluguru Mountains, Tanzania
  • Project Developer Perspectives: Charlotte Streck, Climate Focus
  • Intermediary Perspectives: Gerald Kairu, ECOTRUST, Uganda
  • Certifier Perspectives: Martin Shroeder, TUV Sud (to be confirmed)
  • Government Perspectives: Dennis Kayambazinthu, Department of Forestry, Malawi
  • Donor Perspectives: Christian Peter, Development Partner Group on Environment, Tanzania (to be confirmed)
 

Questions and Discussion

6:15 - 6:30

  CLOSING REMARKS

Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group

6:30 - 7:30

  RECEPTION & ENTERTAINMENT

7:30 - 9:30

  DINNER

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

Objectives - (1)  Exploring key issues and challenges for Tanzania in developing a potential REDD program and assisting other regional participants to think through their national processes; (2) ;Drafting a possible road map of a REDD Readiness strategy
Time   Description

9:00 - 9:15AM

  INTRODUCTION TO THE DAY: OBJECTIVE AND STRUCTURE

Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group

9:15 - 10:45

  PANEL 1: GETTING READY FOR REDD IN TANZANIA

Moderated by: Brent Swallow and Aichi Kitalyi, ICRAF

  • REDD International Discussions & Implications for Tanzania and the Region- Joerg Seifert-Granzin, FAN Bolivia
  • The Status of REDD Readiness in Tanzania - Robert Otsyina, Development Associates, Tanzania
  • Opportunities for REDD with Sustainable Benefits:What Challenges for Tanzania? - Peter Minang, ICRAF, Kenya
  • Experience from the ‘Kyoto Think Global Act Local’ Kitulangalo Project - Eliakabu Zahabu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania
  • Institutional Challenges & How to Channel Payments to Communities - Tom Blomley, Department of Forestry and Bee Keeping Tanzania

Questions and Discussion 

10:45 - 11:05

  BREAK

11:05 -12:45PM

  REDD BREAK-OUT GROUPS

  • Group 1: REDD Carbon Measurement and Capacity Group: Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by Robert Otsyina, Development Associates, Tanzania
  • Group 2: REDD Policy, Legal and Institutional Framework Group: Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by Felician Kilahama, Department of Forestry and Bee Keeping
  • Group 3: REDD Community Forestry & Sustainable Charcoal Group:Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by Thabit Masoud, CARE International in Tanzania

12:45 - 1:45

  LUNCH

1:45 - 3:00

  REPORT BACK OF REDD GROUPS AND COMMENTS ON ROAD MAPS

Moderated by: William Garrett, Energy for Sustainable Development, Kenya?

3:00 - 4:00

  PLENARY DISCUSSION: HOW CAN TANZANIA MOVE FORWARD ON REDD?

Moderated by Charlotte Streck, Climate Focus, Netherlands

• What would a coherent national REDD strategy look like?

• What are the key components of a Readiness Strategy?

• What are the most appropriate pilot or demonstration projects in Tanzania, and how should they be organized?

• What institutional arrangements and financial support are needed for a REDD program?

• How could the Katoomba Group support REDD in Tanzania?

4:00 -– 4:30

  BREAK

4:30 5:30

  WRAP UP AND CLOSING COMMENTS

Moderated by: Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group

• What can we take forward from this meeting?

• What are the next steps?

6:00 - 9:00

  COCKTAILS & DINNER
Launch of the ICRAF Pro-Poor Rewards for Environmental Services (PRESA) Project

Brent Swallow, ICRAF-PRESA Project Coordinator
Balaram Thapa, Chair, PRESA International Advisory Group


KEY NOTE SPEECH
Why Should the Private Sector Get Involved in PES?
Eng. Alex Kaaya, CEO, Dar es Salaam Water and Sewerage Company (DAWASCO)

 

PRIVATE MEETING - September 18-20, Morogoro Hotel, Morogoro, Tanzania  (Learn about new tools for PES)

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

Objective - Learn about new tools for PES

Time   Description

8:00AM 12:00PM

   TRAVEL FROM DAR-ES-SALAAM TO MOROGORO & CHECK-IN

1:00 2:00

  LUNCH

2:00 - 2:30 

  WELCOME & OVERVIEW

2:30 4:00

  TOOL DEMONSTRATION 1

Mapping and Modeling Tools for Ecosystem Service Assessment

Taylor Ricketts & Nasser Olwero, WWF-US & the Natural Capital Project
Boniface Mbilinyi, Sokoine University of Agriculture

Questions & Discussion

4:00 4:20

  BREAK

4:20 - 5:50

  TOOL DEMONSTRATION 2

Rapid Assessment Tools for Carbon, Water & Biodiversity

Led by Brent Swallow & Thomas Yatich, ICRAF

Questions & Discussion

5:50 - 6:45

  FIELD TRIP BRIEFING AND INSTRUCTIONS
  • EPWS Project Site: Dosteus Lopa, CARE, Tanzania
  • Potential REDD Site: Eliakamu Zahabu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro
  Questions & Discussion

6:45 - 9:00

  ENTERTAINMENT & DINNER

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

Objective - Field Trips

Time    Description

8:30AM - 6:00PM

  FIELD TRIPS (Occurring Simultaneously)

GROUP 1 - 
ULUGURU MOUNTAINS
CARE/WWF Equitable Payment for Watershed Services Project Site (EPWS)

The “Equitable Payment for Water Services (EPWS)” project is based in the Uluguru and East Usambara Mountains in Morogoro region. The project is focusing on Ruvu and Sigi River basins which are the major sources of water to the cities of Dar-es-Salaam and Tanga respectively. These two cities are important industrial centers and contribute significantly to the country’s GDP. In addition, many communities reside adjacent to these watersheds and depend on them for their livelihoods. Various activities conducted by the upland communities contribute to the deteriorating quantity and quality of water in Dar-es-Salaam and Tanga. These problems are largely attributed to: unsustainable farmland expansion and irrigation practices; deforestation; and illegal mining activities in river systems and within forest reserves.

The EPWS project aims to: 

• Establish long term financial investment in modifying land use to conserve and improve “watersheds” for reliable flow and quality of water; 

• Create a compensation mechanism that recognizes the needs and priorities of the marginalized and poor people, and 

• Improve quality of life of the communities through substantial benefits to the rural poor thereby contributing to poverty reduction. 

So far key preliminary work has been undertaken, including: (1) a watershed services market assessment, (2) a profiling of potential buyers, and (3) a study on hydrologic and land use/cover change assessment. Additional background studies are in process, including a livelihood assessment; potential sellers’ cost / benefit analysis; legal and institutional framework analysis, and cost / benefit Analysis for buyers. 

The EPWS project is financed by Directorate General for International Cooperation (DGIS), and Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA).


GROUP 2 - 
KITULANGALO-SOKOINE UNIVERSITY TRAINING FOREST RESERVE
Potential REDD site

Kitulangalo forest reserve lies about 50 km to the east of Morogoro town, on the side of the Dar-es-Salaam- Morogoro highway. This is a relatively dry area with an average annual rainfall of about 850 mm. The easy access from the highway has made this area a prime charcoal production area for the supply for the nearby Morogoro municipality and Dar-es-Salaam city. The forests in this area are also under pressure from timber extraction through the activities of local pit-sawyers, and from cutting of tree stems for building poles. Overall, the area has been a de facto an open access resource. 

In 1995, however, part of the Government Catchment Forest Reserve (600 ha) was given to Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) as a Training Forest Reserve. The land is still owned by the government, but the management is mainly in the hands of the university and the local community following jointly prepared management guidelines. In 2000, another 420 ha was demarcated for the village community, and is now called Kiminyu Village Forest Reserve (VFR). As a community forest, the land is now the property of the village, which has full responsibility for management. Both areas are characterized by Miombo (savanna woodland) and the predominant genus are Brachystegia and Julbernadia. The fact that two different management regimes are operating side by side in essentially the same type of forest makes the Kitulangalo forest a particularly interesting one to study. 

A Village Forest Committee (VFC) was established in 2000 and given the responsibility of supervising the management of the forests on behalf of the village government. The VFC mobilizes local people, and selects villagers to patrol the forests and report to the village government through the committee. The committee members were elected by general village assembly. To institute its mandate, the village government set by-laws that have been agreed upon by the village general assembly. The bylaws specify how benefits will be distributed and consist of different penalties charged against offenders who violate the rules regulating sustainable forest management and use in the village. 

As part of the “Kyoto: Think Global Act Local” research project, six persons (four women and two men) were trained in mapping and forest inventory techniques. Since 2005, carbon data have been collected from this forest and also from unreserved forests on village land by the local communities. Results show that there is improving health of the reserved forests compared to unreserved forests. The university hopes that with this information the village could be a potential REDD candidate.

6:00 - – 9:00PM

  DINNER & REFLECTIONS FROM THE FIELD TRIPS

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

Objective: To improve understanding of key design issues, roadblocks and potential ways forward in the development of efficient and equitable payments for watershed services.

Time   Description

9:00 - – 9:15AM

  OVERVIEW OF THE DAY & DEBRIEF FROM FIELD TRIP

Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group
Balaram Thapa, CARE , Tanzania

9:15 -– 10:00

  PANEL 1: DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PWS PROJECTS
  • The CARE/WWF EPWS Scheme - Dosteus Lopa, CARE International
  • The Maloti-Drakensberg Transfrontier Project - Myles Mander, Future Works, South Africa

Questions & Discussion

10:00 - 11:15

  PANEL 2: ADDRESSING KEY CHALLENGES TO EFFICIENT & EQUITABLE PWS SCHEMES

  • How Should Buyers and Sellers be Organized? - Richard Coombe, Natural Resource Conservation Service, USA
  • How Should the Market Deal be Structured? - Mark Kieser, Kieser and Associates, USA
  • How Can Disbursement Mechanisms Ensure Equitable Distribution? - Teresita Amezcua-Jaeger, Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición, Mexico
  • How to Undertake Effective Monitoring and Verification of Service Delivery? - Dan Nees, World Resources Institute, USA

Questions and Discussion (15 minutes)

11:15 11:30

  BREAK

11:30 - –1:00PM

  BREAK-OUT GROUPS

  • Group 1: Identifying Prospective Sellers & Buyers - Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by Myles Mander, FutureWorks, South Africa
  • Group 2: Negotiating Agreements & Disbursement Mechanisms that Ensure Equity - Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by George Jambiya, WWF, Tanzania
  • Group 3: Policy, Legal and Institutional Issues Associated with PWS - Identify key roadblocks, priority action areas and research/capacity building needs and generate a provisional road-map. Led by Thabit Masoud, CARE International in Tanzania

1:00 - – 2:00

  LUNCH

2:00 -  – 3:15

  PLENARY & REPORT BACK FROM BREAK-OUT GROUPS

Questions & Discussion

3:15 -  – 4:15

  THE KATOOMBA INCUBATOR CONCEPT AND APPLICATION IN LATIN AMERICA & AFRICA

Jacob Olander, Eco Decisión, Ecuador

Sara Namirembe, East & Southern Africa Katoomba Group Incubator, Uganda

Questions & Discussion

4:15 -  – 4:35

  BREAK

4:35 6:00

  CLOSING PLENARY & NEXT STEPS

Michael Jenkins, President, Forest Trends & the Katoomba Group
Alice Ruhweza, Coordinator, East & Southern Africa Katoomba Group
Balaram Thapa, CARE International in Tanzania
George Jambiya, WWF Tanzania Program Office

 

PARTNERS INVOLVED IN PRODUCING THIS EVENT:

 

kg logo  ft logo  care logo   nat cap logo   wwf logo usaid-small.gif
 
Back to Top