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Case studies (Forest Management)

by Portal Web Editor last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Case Studies by country
File CATTLE, COCKATOOS, CHAMELEONS, AND NINJA TURTLES: SEEKING SUSTAINABILITY IN FOREST MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION IN NUSA TENGGARA, INDONESIA by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION During the past three decades, Indonesia’s forest lands have been mapped, classified, and utilized to meet increasing demands for commercial exploitation, watershed protection, recreation, and biodiversity conservation. Throughout the archipelago, previously isolated forest areas have been opened up through rapid development of roads and the extension of government administrative units. Shifting demographic and economic trends have hastened the pace of change and the interest in these forest areas, intensifying resource management conflicts. Rural communities living in and around these protected areas have been gradually marginalized from decision-making processes and disenfranchised from important forest resources.
File CHANGING FOREST POLICIES AND INSTITUTIONAL INNOVATIONS: USER GROUP APPROACH IN COMMUNITY FORESTRY OF NEPAL by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
COUNTRY INFORMATION Located between India and China, and occupying an area of 141,000 sq km, Nepal extends from 80015' - 88010' south-east longitudes to 26020' - 30010' north-west latitudes for 800 km, mainly along the south slope of the central Himalayas. While the northern part includes major ecological zones of High Himal, High Mountains, Middle Hills and Siwaliks, the southern part is the Tarai ecological zone, an extension of the gangetic plain. The altitude ranges from less than 100 m in the southern plain to more than 8000 m in the northern Himalayas. Due to sharp latitudinal differences and climatic conditions (sub-tropical to alpine), distribution of forests, farming systems and living style of the people vary greatly.
File COMMUNITY FOREST OWNERSHIP: KEY TO SUSTAINABLE FOREST RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. THE GAMBIAN EXPERIENCE by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 02:55 PM
INTRODUCTION At the turn of the century The Gambia was still covered by dense and almost impenetrable forests. In 1981 about 430.000 ha or 45 percent of the total land area were classified as forest, it was estimated that this area was further reduced to about 340.000 ha or 30 percent of the land area in 1988. Likewise, the degradation of the forest condition is so severe that most closed forests have disappeared, leaving only a tree and shrub savanna of poor quality. The Gambia belongs to the group of the least developed countries, with an average income of US $ 325 per capita. Its population of 1,025,000 (1993) relies mainly on forest resources for its energy needs.
File Community Forest Ownership: Key to Sustainable Forest Resource Management. The Gambian Experience by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Abstract: This is a case of the changes brought about in traditional forest management practices of the Forest Department in The Gambia, following large-scale deforestation and destruction of invaluable forest resources and realization of the need for community involvement in their protection and maintenance. With the support of the Gambian German Forestry Project (GGFP), the Forest Department introduced community forestry in 1990. The institutional changes included creation of Forest Committees at the village level that are responsible, along with the Forest Department, for developing and following the Community Forest Management Agreements, and for taking revenue management and conflict management decisions. In the latter activity help from traditional chiefs are taken. While technical assistance is provided by the Forest Department, the communities use traditional culture as a basis for organizing themselves into various task forces. One of the key lessons from this experience is that communities should be granted permanent ownership rights over the clearly demarcated forest resources being protected by them, on the condition that they would sustainably manage the resources. In addition the absence of financial incentives for undertaking these tasks instilled a sense of ownership and responsibility within the communities. Approval by the concerned Government of the new Gambian Forest Policy in 1995, and its consequent legislative approval, provided a much needed legal standing to this innovative approach which is now being implemented countrywide. This case study details the participatory process involved in bringing about the existing changes in The Gambian Forest sector, and other related natural resource management practices.
File COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
THE CONTEXT Project Location The case study is based on a pilot project entitled “Maintaining Biodiversity in Pakistan with Rural Community Development”. This is a four year nationally executed pilot project funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) through UNDP. The project area is located in the Northern Pakistan and is characterized by a high altitude cold mountain desert ecosystem (see Figure 1). The ecosystem consists of high alpine pastures with scattered patches of juniper/birch forests. The main wildlife species include snow leopard, ibex, marco polo sheep, markhor, musk deer, brown and black bear, and partridges.
File COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND WATERSHED RESOURCE CONFLICTS: A CASE STUDY FROM NAM NGUM, LAO PDR by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION Alternative approaches to resolving intensified resource use conflicts can be examined through a basic diagnostic approach that works backwards and forwards from the points of conflict. Working backwards usually involves seeing conflict as an outcome of resource competition among different actors, either similar actors each of whom places more pressure over a resource to which all lay claim, or different types of actors making a combination of direct and indirect claims on a resource for various uses. The next stage back is thus to examine resource competition in terms of intensified or changed use of a particular resource. This ultimately necessitates examining a starting point of existing resource use patterns by different actors in a particular context, and the forces for change that lead to pressure. Thus, resource use, intensification/change, competition, conflict are examined in sequence. The stage forward from such an examination is to examine cooperative solutions as alternative means of resolving conflicts, and this implies a combination of bio-physical and social analysis of the resource conflict in question.
File COMMUNITY-BASED NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FROM VILLAGES TO AN INTER-VILLAGE NETWORK: A CASE STUDY IN PANG MA PHA DISTRICT, MAE by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION The forests in northern Thailand are one of the largest remaining forest resources of the country and serve as the main watershed areas for the Chao Phraya basin (1). Increasing emphasis is now being placed nationally on the conservation of flora and fauna in these fertile, but sensitive watersheds.
File COMPLEMENTARITY OF INSTITUTIONS: A PREREQUISITE FOR THE SUCCESS OF JOINT FOREST MANAGEMENT. A COMPARATIVE CASE OF FOUR VILLAGES FROM INDIA by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION India’s forests have played an integral role in sustaining its people over many millennia. In addition to an abundance of nutritional, medicinal and subsistence goods, wilderness areas have provided the environment for spiritual and cultural expression of the Indian people. In the pre-British period, the ownership of forests was with the Kings, but the forest regimes were aimed at fair distribution of returns to all sections of society. In the Maurayan period (324 to 180 B.C.) forests were classified in three classes: (i) Reserve forests; (ii) Forests donated to eminent Brahmans; and, (iii) Forests for the public. The reserve forest were of two categories - reserve forests for the king and reserve forests for the state (Dwivedi 1980: 9). Hence, the Maurayan-empire aimed to match the requirements of each section of society through a classification of forests. There are no records of classification-based forest management in the post-Maurayan period. With a few exceptions, access to forests were largely unrestricted. However, ultimate control over forest lands lay in the hands of the ruler of the territory (Stebbing 1922). The focus of forest ‘management’ continued to be geared towards the fair distribution of returns, and had characteristics of communal forest regimes
File COMPLEMENTARITY OF INSTITUTIONS: A PREREQUISITE FOR THE SUCCESS OF JOINT FOREST MANAGEMENT. A COMPARATIVE CASE OF FOUR VILLAGES FROM INDIA by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
India’s forests have played an integral role in sustaining its people over many millennia. In addition to an abundance of nutritional, medicinal and subsistence goods, wilderness areas have provided the environment for spiritual and cultural expression of the Indian people. In the pre-British period, the ownership of forests was with the Kings, but the forest regimes were aimed at fair distribution of returns to all sections of society. In the Maurayan period (324 to 180 B.C.) forests were classified in three classes: (i) Reserve forests; (ii) Forests donated to eminent Brahmans; and, (iii) Forests for the public. The reserve forest were of two categories - reserve forests for the king and reserve forests for the state (Dwivedi 1980: 9). Hence, the Maurayan-empire aimed to match the requirements of each section of society through a classification of forests. There are no records of classification-based forest management in the post-Maurayan period. With a few exceptions, access to forests were largely unrestricted. However, ultimate control over forest lands lay in the hands of the ruler of the territory (Stebbing 1922). The focus of forest ‘management’ continued to be geared towards the fair distribution of returns, and had characteristics of communal forest regimes.
File CONFLICT RESOLUTION AS A KEY ELEMENT FOR CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WITH LOCAL PARTICIPATION: THE CASE OF THE GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS (1)(EN) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
CASE IDENTIFICATION Country and Region Ecuador, Galápagos Islands Type of Renewable Resource Marine resources are particularly important as regards sustainable development for the local population. The land ecosystems are especially valuable for science and ultimately for the tourism industry. Both the fishery resources and the tourism resources are subject to pressures from the national and international outside markets. The economic crisis besetting mainland Ecuador is reflected in the Galápagos by the constant increase in the number of immigrants.
File CONFLICT RESOLUTION AS A KEY ELEMENT FOR CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT WITH LOCAL PARTICIPATION: THE CASE OF THE GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
CASE IDENTIFICATION Country and Region Ecuador, Galápagos Islands Type of Renewable Resource Marine resources are particularly important as regards sustainable development for the local population. The land ecosystems are especially valuable for science and ultimately for the tourism industry. Both the fishery resources and the tourism resources are subject to pressures from the national and international outside markets. The economic crisis besetting mainland Ecuador is reflected in the Galápagos by the constant increase in the number of immigrants.
File COPAN: COLLABORATION FOR IDENTITY, EQUITY and Sustainability (HONDURAS) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION Copan: Site, Agriculture and Population Honduras, a country with an area of 112,420 sq km and a population of close to five million inhabitants is located in the heart of Central America. Conquered by the Spaniards in the early 1500s, only around 7 percent of the population is indigenous, due to various causes including wars, diseases and intermarriage with descendants of the Spanish immigrants.
File COPAN: COLLABORATION FOR IDENTITY, EQUITY and Sustainability (HONDURAS) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCTION Copan: Site, Agriculture and Population Honduras, a country with an area of 112,420 sq km and a population of close to five million inhabitants is located in the heart of Central America. Conquered by the Spaniards in the early 1500s, only around 7 percent of the population is indigenous, due to various causes including wars, diseases and intermarriage with descendants of the Spanish immigrants.
File CREATING CONDITIONS FOR COMMUNITY-BASED SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE CARRIBEAN by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Barbados. his case study concerns the small island developing states (SIDS) of the eastern Caribbean which are part of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Emphasis is placed on Barbados. Other countries briefly examined are Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Grenada.
File INSTITUTIONAL CHALLENGES IN CONSERVATION: THE CASE OF THE SACRED KAYA FORESTS OF THE KENYA COAST by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Summary In recent years, the importance of developing enabling institutional environments has been increasingly acknowleged in the conservation and development fields. Effective institutional frameworks are now regarded as crucial if continuance of positive changes is to be assured. This case study on Kaya forest conservation in Kenya does not describe a process which is in any way complete or even well advanced. Rather it reports the result of a gradual analysis of the situation and increasing understanding of the institutional need. This has gone on while urgent circumstances have dictated that short and medium term activites be undertaken even before any consultation, strategic planning or formulation in the institutional area. Following from analysis of required changes, possible institutional objectives and activities have suggested themselves for the long-term conservation of Kayas. Problems and constraints experienced so far in implementation, and anticipated, are also discussed.
File INVOLVING CIVIL SOCIETY: THE DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS SUBPROGRAM OF THE PILOT PROGRAM TO CONSERVE THE BRAZILIAN RAINFOREST by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
The Brazilian Amazon is a region of continental dimensions, with a surface area equivalent to more than thirty European countries. Outside of South America, humid tropical forests are to be found in Africa and Asia. The planet’s stock of tropical forests has been reduced to 60 percent of the 14 million square kilometers of primitive coverage, and now occupies only approximately 6 percent of the emersed lands of the planet. Brazil has about 40 percent of that forest land
File LA RESOLUCIÓN DE CONFLICTOS COMO UN ELEMENTO CLAVE PARA LA CONSERVACIÓN Y MANEJO SOSTENIBLE by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
INTRODUCCIÓN El caso de la comunidad local de pescadores de las islas Galápagos, Ecuador, combina varios elementos: experiencia temprana y exitosa de protección de un área natural excepcionalmente valiosa conflicto prolongado de intereses de uso entre varios grupos de interés, y resolución del mismo a través de la aprobación de una nueva ley especial formulada mediante un proceso participativo.
File LaoPDR Figure 1. Nam Ngum Watershed and Study Sites by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
 
File LOCAL GOVERNANCE AND PARTICIPATORY NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: USAID’S GOLD PROJECT IN THE PHILIPPINES by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Major authorities and responsibilities for agricultural extension and environmental planning, monitoring and management have been devolved to local governments in the Philippines under recent decentralization legislation. Such legislation has placed substantial decisions in the hands of local governing institutions with high levels of citizen participation. This is a major departure from more conventional resource management systems premised on macro policy-based “command/control” formulas applied by central agencies that typically optimize technical solutions and minimize - or altogether bypass – formal local governing institutions.
File LOCAL PARTICIPATION AS AN INSTRUMENT FOR NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT UNDER THE COMMUNAL AREAS MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME FOR INDIGENOUS RESOURCES (CAMPFIRE) IN ZIMBABWE by Portal Web Editor — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
IDENTIFICATION OF THE CASE The case study is focussed on the Communal Areas Management Programme For Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE) which is spread in thirty six of the fifty seven districts of Zimbabwe, and is involved in the sustainable utilization of renewable natural resources such as wildlife, forestry, cultural resources and eco-tourism. This is implemented in the context of a decentralized management through Appropriate Authority status bestowed upon Rural District Councils (RDCs). Agriculturally marginal areas of Zimbabwe are involved. The benefits that accrue to rural communities are in the form of cash dividends, community-based projects and locally empowered leadership.
File MAKING IT PAY: CAN COMMUNITY-BASED BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION PROGRAMMES BE SUSTAINED THROUGH MARKET-DRIVEN INCOME GENERATION SCHEMES? (JORDAN) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
This case study examines the results of a pioneering project, implemented by the RSCN, which has attempted to sustain biodiversity conservation in Jordan’s protected areas through the development of community based, market-driven income generation and tourism programmes. It describes how income generation schemes can be used to help regulate damaging resource-use practices and promote more positive attitudes towards conservation initiatives. It also draws attention to the benefits of institutional strengthening for enabling community based approaches to be effectively implemented and sustained.
File NGOs AND INSTITUTIONAL REFORMS: A CASE STUDY OF IRRIGATION SECTOR REFORMS IN GUJARAT, INDIA by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
BACKGROUND Being dependent for a long time on the vagaries of monsoon, India has placed a very great emphasis on development of the irrigation sector right from independence. However the problems of under-utilisation, lack of access by tail-end farmers, poor maintenance and non-viability of the irrigation systems persist in the government owned surface irrigation schemes. On the other hand, small, privately owned irrigation systems (dugwells, tubewells, etc.) are found to be more efficient and provide more than 50 percent of irrigation in India. Water rates have not been increased because of political populism. In fact, the average water rate is only 3 percent of the estimated net benefit from irrigation. Because of the low water rates and poor recovery rates, revenue from the irrigation sector covers only 20 percent of the cost of operation and maintenance, making the sector highly subsidised and non-viable. These problems in the irrigation sector are more or less found in all states of India.
File Pakistan-Figure-1 by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
 
File Pakistan-Map-1 by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
 
File Pakistan-Map-2 by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
 
File Participatory Coastal Development Planning in Bolinao, Northern Philippines: A Potent Tool for Conflict Resolution by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
IDENTIFICATION OF THE CASE The case study area is the Municipality (Town) of Bolinao, Province of Pangasinan, located along the northwest coast of Luzon, Philippines, and one of seventeen towns bordering the Lingayen Gulf (see Map 1). Bolinao has one of the most extensively developed reef system and associated habitats in northern Luzon. Demersal fish, shellfish and seaweeds living in reef and seagrass areas dominate the fisheries of the town.
File PARTICIPATORY PROCESS OF ORGANIZING EFFECTIVE COMMUNITY-BASED GROUPS by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
After they attained independence from the colonial rule, developing countries in many parts of the world took upon themselves the responsibility for national development including that of natural resources. After spending enormous resources that are scarce, the developing countries have slowly and painfully learnt for themselves as well as for the people, that government bureaucracy is not the right agency for developing local resources that are so diverse, as are the communities dependent on them. The paths of planned development are littered with such failed schemes, which when launched, were claimed to be panacea.
File Philippines Map1 by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
Lingayen Gulf and its reef environs.Fg 1.
File RAPPROCHEMENT DES PASTEURS ET AGROPASTEURS DANS LA ZONE DE KISHI BEIGA. ETUDE DE CAS DU PROGRAMME SAHEL BURKINABÈ PSB-GTZ (BURKINA FASO) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
CONTEXTE GENERALE La zone de Kishi Beiga Kishi Beiga est une vaste zone située dans la province de l’Oudalan, au Nord du Burkina Faso (pays au coeur de l’Afrique de l’Ouest). A vocation pastorale principalement, cette zone, est assez faiblement arrosée (isohètes 350 à 600 mm) et connaît une forte variation pluviométrique dans le temps et dans l’espace. Elle est composée de plusieurs villages et hameaux et peuplé d'une mosaïque d’ethnies dont les Touareg, les Bellah, les différents sous groupes Peulh et les groupes dérivant des Songhai (Mallébé). Kishi Beïga est sous l’autorité coutumière d'un chef Touareg (qui vient d’être réhabilité), le chef de canton qui réside à Gorom Gorom pour le fait qu’il coiffe toute la chefferie de l’Oudalan. L’état y est représenté par un responsable administratif villageois (RAV) Mallebé. La zone regorge d’énormes potentialités pastorales. Cela suscite l’arrivée périodique de plusieurs groupes de transhumants des régions avoisinantes, qui tentent de cohabiter avec les agro-pasteurs sédentaires et les pasteurs autochtones. On y rencontre de grands parcours de saisons sèche et pluvieuse, des mares, des cours d’eau et la cure salée.
File RECONCILING HUMAN INTERESTS WITH CONSERVATION IN THE SELOUS GAME RESERVE (TANZANIA) by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
In view of the problems facing conservation, efforts to reconcile human interest with nature were initiated in the Selous Game Reserve (SGR). The process entails organizing community groups at village, district and central government levels as a preparatory step towards sharing the benefits and costs of conservation.
File RESOURCE ACCESS: A MAJOR CAUSE OF ARMED CONFLICT IN THE SUDAN. THE CASE OF THE NUBA MOUNTAINS by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
ABSTRACT The famine in southern Sudan is threatening the lives of more than half a million southerners, especially in Bahr El Ghazal province. The famine has provoked a debate into its causes. Most commentators in the United Kingdom accused the war of being the main culprit. A few days ago, in the House of Commons, a conservative MP stood up and said that the war in the Sudan, and all wars in Africa for that matter, are caused by the political vacuum left behind by colonial powers and wondered if something could be done about that! Clare Short, the Minister for Overseas Development, called the Hounrable Gentleman foolish to ask implicitly for the return of colonialism. The war and the famine, she said, are the responsibility of the leadership on both sides of the conflict. They have to stop the war now and everything would go back to normal. She sat down happy in the feeling that she had defeated the argument of her conservative opponent. The war, according to Clare Short, is all about African leaders. The BBC, however, knew better. Commenting on the pictures of emaciated southern Sudanese children, its newsreader described the war as between Muslim Arabs in the north and Christian Africans in the south. The war is thus a religious and ethnic war. All three interpretations belong to traditional schools of conflict analysis, which explain all armed conflicts in Africa as ethnic, tribal, cultural, religious, etc. These interpretations throw the stick of ethnicity at all conflicts and see there, it devours them all. This is not only unhelpful, but could seriously hamper efforts at genuine conflict management and conflict resolution. A study of all three major violent conflicts in the Sudan shows the futility of this traditional approach to conflict analysis and conflict resolution.
File THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A PRIVATE, NON-COMMERCIAL PROTECTED TERRITORY: THE CASE OF MURAVIOVKA PARK OF SUSTAINABLE LAND USE IN AMUR REGION, RUSSIA by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
IDENTIFICATION OF THE CASE This case study, which comes from the Muraviovka Park of Sustainable Land Use in the Tambovka District of the Amur Region in Russia, relates to two types of renewable natural resources: Watersheds and biodiversity (including endangered species of cranes and storks).
File TOWARDS A PLATFORM FOR DEVELOPMENT: BRINGING TOGETHER PASTORALISTS AND AGRO-PASTORALISTS by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
THE CONTEXT The Kishi Beiga Area Kishi Beiga is a vast region in the Oudalan province of northern Burkina Faso (a country located at the heart of West Africa). Pastoralism is the main activity in the area; rainfall is quite low (isohyets of 350 to 600 mm) and very irregular in time and space. The area consists of numerous villages and hamlets and many different ethnic groups, including the Touaregs, the Bellah, various Peul subgroups and other groups derived from the Songhai (Mallébé). Kishi Beiga falls under the traditional authority of a Touareg chief (who has just been reinstated), the canton chief who lives in Gorom Gorom and controls the entire Oudalan district. The government is represented by a Mallébé village administrator. The area holds tremendous potential for pastoralism and, as a result, several transhumance groups from neighboring regions appear periodically and attempt to cohabit with the sedentary agro-pastoralists. There are vast dry season and rainy season pasturelands, ponds, water courses and salt resources used for treatments.
File TOWARDS A PLATFORM FOR DEVELOPMENT: BRINGING TOGETHER PASTORALISTS AND AGRO-PASTORALISTS by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
THE CONTEXT The Kishi Beiga Area Kishi Beiga is a vast region in the Oudalan province of northern Burkina Faso (a country located at the heart of West Africa). Pastoralism is the main activity in the area; rainfall is quite low (isohyets of 350 to 600 mm) and very irregular in time and space. The area consists of numerous villages and hamlets and many different ethnic groups, including the Touaregs, the Bellah, various Peul subgroups and other groups derived from the Songhai (Mallébé). Kishi Beiga falls under the traditional authority of a Touareg chief (who has just been reinstated), the canton chief who lives in Gorom Gorom and controls the entire Oudalan district. The government is represented by a Mallébé village administrator. The area holds tremendous potential for pastoralism and, as a result, several transhumance groups from neighboring regions appear periodically and attempt to cohabit with the sedentary agro-pastoralists. There are vast dry season and rainy season pasturelands, ponds, water courses and salt resources used for treatments.
File Towards a Platform for Development: Bringing Together Pastoralists and Agro-Pastoralists in the Kishi Beiga Area by Jean Brennan — last modified Jan 10, 2013 09:49 AM
This is a case study of the Burkina Sahel Program in Burkina Faso, West Africa, and the project “Village Lands and Natural Resources Management through Self-Development” developed in the Kishi Beiga area in particular. This project (PSB-GTZ), initiated in 1991, was implemented in a limited pilot area using the village lands management approach. Following an initial failure, the project revised its approach and operating strategy in favor of an interactive process of communication with all groups and neighborhoods and developing local potential for consultation among different groups. Using the area’s traditional organizational structure to regulate access to resources on a seasonal basis, the project facilitated the creation of a Consultative Unit linking different groups (agro-pastoralists and pastoralists). This provided the project official recognition and established improved channels of communication between the project implementors, other technical and financial partners active in the area and the local people. It provided a platform of expression, thereby successfully resolving latent conflicts between different groups. At the same time an inter-active approach for self-evaluation of the unit allowed the project to move forward and achieve a level of vitality and thereby enhance long-term sustainability of the institution.
 
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